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Borderline personlighedsforstyrrelse

Baagö, Anna LU (2012) GNVK01 20112
Department of Gender Studies
Abstract
This is a feminist study of the diagnosis 'borderline personality disorder' as a feminized shadow of an almost unquestionable idea in the contemporary Western democracies: The free individual. Based on qualitative interviews with patients with borderline personality disorder and psy-workers, this study provides an understanding of borderline personality disorder as both a technology of government, and a technology of the self, which is produced in the power relations between patient and employee, and between discourse and body. The study focuses on how the diagnosis influences the way subjects come into being and how they understand themselves and each other. It shows that the diagnosis is an ambiguous recognition of the patient, because... (More)
This is a feminist study of the diagnosis 'borderline personality disorder' as a feminized shadow of an almost unquestionable idea in the contemporary Western democracies: The free individual. Based on qualitative interviews with patients with borderline personality disorder and psy-workers, this study provides an understanding of borderline personality disorder as both a technology of government, and a technology of the self, which is produced in the power relations between patient and employee, and between discourse and body. The study focuses on how the diagnosis influences the way subjects come into being and how they understand themselves and each other. It shows that the diagnosis is an ambiguous recognition of the patient, because it recognizes her by labeling her as disordered. Drawing on affect theory the study shows how affective economies are in use when establishing the boundaries between the normative, rational individual, and the disordered Other. It reveals how negotiations of these boundaries are closely linked to hierarchical gendered dichotomies that are imbedded both in the psy-institutions, but also on a more general scale in a Western liberal discourse. These discursive and affective processes contributes to individualize social problems. Finally, the study therefore suggests, alternative confirmative communities as a counterstrategy. (Less)
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author
Baagö, Anna LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Opretholdelsen af ideen om det selvstændige, frie individ
course
GNVK01 20112
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
borderline personality disorder, psychiatry, affective economies, gender science, individualism, the self borderline personlighedsforstyrrelse, psykiatri, affektive økonomier, kønsforskning, individualisering, selvet
language
Danish
id
2292251
date added to LUP
2012-02-28 11:39:31
date last changed
2012-02-28 11:39:31
@misc{2292251,
  abstract     = {This is a feminist study of the diagnosis 'borderline personality disorder' as a feminized shadow of an almost unquestionable idea in the contemporary Western democracies: The free individual. Based on qualitative interviews with patients with borderline personality disorder and psy-workers, this study provides an understanding of borderline personality disorder as both a technology of government, and a technology of the self, which is produced in the power relations between patient and employee, and between discourse and body. The study focuses on how the diagnosis influences the way subjects come into being and how they understand themselves and each other. It shows that the diagnosis is an ambiguous recognition of the patient, because it recognizes her by labeling her as disordered. Drawing on affect theory the study shows how affective economies are in use when establishing the boundaries between the normative, rational individual, and the disordered Other. It reveals how negotiations of these boundaries are closely linked to hierarchical gendered dichotomies that are imbedded both in the psy-institutions, but also on a more general scale in a Western liberal discourse. These discursive and affective processes contributes to individualize social problems. Finally, the study therefore suggests, alternative confirmative communities as a counterstrategy.},
  author       = {Baagö, Anna},
  keyword      = {borderline personality disorder,psychiatry,affective economies,gender science,individualism,the self

borderline personlighedsforstyrrelse,psykiatri,affektive økonomier,kønsforskning,individualisering,selvet},
  language     = {dan},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Borderline personlighedsforstyrrelse},
  year         = {2012},
}