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Færøske daginstitutioner og dagplejer år 2009

Patursson, Tjódhild LU (2012) STAK01 20102
Department of Statistics
Abstract
Most Faroese children attend day nurseries, kindergartens, day care centres or leisure schools. More than 65 % of children 0 – 10 years old attend such institutions, and when looking at 4 – 5 year olds it is more than 95% of the children. This is according to statistics from the Faroese Ministry of Culture and Education from 2009. Therefore one can conclude that the institutions have an important role in the development of Faroese children.
The great responsibility placed on these child care institutions and those who work there, is without doubt the reason for public recommendations regarding how many of the workers taking care of the children should have qualifications as educators, as well as recommendations for how many working hours... (More)
Most Faroese children attend day nurseries, kindergartens, day care centres or leisure schools. More than 65 % of children 0 – 10 years old attend such institutions, and when looking at 4 – 5 year olds it is more than 95% of the children. This is according to statistics from the Faroese Ministry of Culture and Education from 2009. Therefore one can conclude that the institutions have an important role in the development of Faroese children.
The great responsibility placed on these child care institutions and those who work there, is without doubt the reason for public recommendations regarding how many of the workers taking care of the children should have qualifications as educators, as well as recommendations for how many working hours should be available pr. Child. These recommendations weren’t followed in 2009. All in all the Faroese kindergartens and nurseries needed 150 more educators to comply with the recommendations.

That working as an educator largely is seen as a “woman’s job” isn’t exactly a secret, and this is clearly reflected in the statistics. Most of the workers are women. Most of the men work in leisure schools where they constitute 15% of the work force. Compared to the other roles in the institutions, it is most common to see men in the role as leaders and this possible reflects a normal pattern in Faroese society.

Girls and boys largely attend child care institutions in equal proportions, albeit considerably fewer 3 year old boys than 3 year old girls attend the institutions. From the available data, it is not possible do anything but speculate about why this is the case. A qualitative examination of the event could be interesting, and could possible lead to an exciting conclusion. However, this is outside the limits to this assignment.

The above description of the child care sector is a picture of the Faroes as a whole, albeit there of course are differences in the different areas of the country. As a whole one can conclude that the closer to the centre one is, the more children are in a kindergartens, nurseries or leisure schools. Day care is most common in the more outlying areas.

The questionnaire which the information from 2009 is based on is slightly modified in 2012 so as to gain more and clearer information from it. (Less)
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author
Patursson, Tjódhild LU
supervisor
organization
course
STAK01 20102
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
Danish
id
2372190
date added to LUP
2012-04-02 20:14:53
date last changed
2012-04-02 20:14:53
@misc{2372190,
  abstract     = {Most Faroese children attend day nurseries, kindergartens, day care centres or leisure schools. More than 65 % of children 0 – 10 years old attend such institutions, and when looking at 4 – 5 year olds it is more than 95% of the children. This is according to statistics from the Faroese Ministry of Culture and Education from 2009. Therefore one can conclude that the institutions have an important role in the development of Faroese children. 
The great responsibility placed on these child care institutions and those who work there, is without doubt the reason for public recommendations regarding how many of the workers taking care of the children should have qualifications as educators, as well as recommendations for how many working hours should be available pr. Child. These recommendations weren’t followed in 2009. All in all the Faroese kindergartens and nurseries needed 150 more educators to comply with the recommendations.

That working as an educator largely is seen as a “woman’s job” isn’t exactly a secret, and this is clearly reflected in the statistics. Most of the workers are women. Most of the men work in leisure schools where they constitute 15% of the work force. Compared to the other roles in the institutions, it is most common to see men in the role as leaders and this possible reflects a normal pattern in Faroese society.

Girls and boys largely attend child care institutions in equal proportions, albeit considerably fewer 3 year old boys than 3 year old girls attend the institutions. From the available data, it is not possible do anything but speculate about why this is the case. A qualitative examination of the event could be interesting, and could possible lead to an exciting conclusion. However, this is outside the limits to this assignment.

The above description of the child care sector is a picture of the Faroes as a whole, albeit there of course are differences in the different areas of the country. As a whole one can conclude that the closer to the centre one is, the more children are in a kindergartens, nurseries or leisure schools. Day care is most common in the more outlying areas.

The questionnaire which the information from 2009 is based on is slightly modified in 2012 so as to gain more and clearer information from it.},
  author       = {Patursson, Tjódhild},
  language     = {dan},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Færøske daginstitutioner og dagplejer år 2009},
  year         = {2012},
}