Advanced

Shouting in the Dark? The Arab Spring as an Expression of Social Anomie in the Bahraini context

Teufele, Lisa LU (2012) MIDM71 20121
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
In the beginning of 2012, on the 25th of January, Egyptians celebrated the first anniversary of Egyptian Revolution, while Bahrain’s anniversary of the February 14 Revolution was marked by violent protest demanding social, political and economic reforms and an end to discriminating policies. Even though one year passed since these revolutionary movements spread from Tunisia all over the Arab world, social scientists still do not provide adequate frameworks to understand and reconstruct the causes and effects of these popular movements. With that said, this research explains the Bahraini uprising from a sociological perspective, by applying Durkheim and Merton’s theory of social anomie. It is argued that due to a non-existing or... (More)
In the beginning of 2012, on the 25th of January, Egyptians celebrated the first anniversary of Egyptian Revolution, while Bahrain’s anniversary of the February 14 Revolution was marked by violent protest demanding social, political and economic reforms and an end to discriminating policies. Even though one year passed since these revolutionary movements spread from Tunisia all over the Arab world, social scientists still do not provide adequate frameworks to understand and reconstruct the causes and effects of these popular movements. With that said, this research explains the Bahraini uprising from a sociological perspective, by applying Durkheim and Merton’s theory of social anomie. It is argued that due to a non-existing or inconsistent norm and value structure, generated by context-specific social and political developments, young Shiites are particularly prone to develop anomic feelings, which lead to protest movements and culminated in the February 14 Revolution. By applying a mixed methods approach, it is possible to identify strong links between social anomie on the system level and the individual level, particularly affecting the young Shiite population, and the February 14 Revolution. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Teufele, Lisa LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM71 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Arab Spring, Bahrain, Political Transition, Social Anomie
language
English
id
2540822
date added to LUP
2012-07-02 15:37:20
date last changed
2012-07-02 15:37:20
@misc{2540822,
  abstract     = {In the beginning of 2012, on the 25th of January, Egyptians celebrated the first anniversary of Egyptian Revolution, while Bahrain’s anniversary of the February 14 Revolution was marked by violent protest demanding social, political and economic reforms and an end to discriminating policies. Even though one year passed since these revolutionary movements spread from Tunisia all over the Arab world, social scientists still do not provide adequate frameworks to understand and reconstruct the causes and effects of these popular movements. With that said, this research explains the Bahraini uprising from a sociological perspective, by applying Durkheim and Merton’s theory of social anomie. It is argued that due to a non-existing or inconsistent norm and value structure, generated by context-specific social and political developments, young Shiites are particularly prone to develop anomic feelings, which lead to protest movements and culminated in the February 14 Revolution. By applying a mixed methods approach, it is possible to identify strong links between social anomie on the system level and the individual level, particularly affecting the young Shiite population, and the February 14 Revolution.},
  author       = {Teufele, Lisa},
  keyword      = {Arab Spring,Bahrain,Political Transition,Social Anomie},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Shouting in the Dark? The Arab Spring as an Expression of Social Anomie in the Bahraini context},
  year         = {2012},
}