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How is HIV/AIDS communicated as a risk for society?

Lyubenov, Lyuben LU (2012) WPMM42 20121
Sociology
Abstract
Nowadays, the number of people infected with HIV/AIDS keeps rising in many countries. How can this risk be managed in society is an issue that gains on relevance. This paper focuses on the topic, how risk is communicated to society in the case of HIV/AIDS in Germany. It also looks at what aspects are emphasized and if different social groups are represented. Two nation-wide campaigns in Germany from 2009 and 2010 are analyzed. The key organizations are the Federal Centre for Health Education, in cooperation with the non-governmental organization German AIDS Aid. The problems are analyzed by using discourse analysis. Therefore the main posters of every campaign were chosen as material. Risk communication theory offers an ideal theoretical... (More)
Nowadays, the number of people infected with HIV/AIDS keeps rising in many countries. How can this risk be managed in society is an issue that gains on relevance. This paper focuses on the topic, how risk is communicated to society in the case of HIV/AIDS in Germany. It also looks at what aspects are emphasized and if different social groups are represented. Two nation-wide campaigns in Germany from 2009 and 2010 are analyzed. The key organizations are the Federal Centre for Health Education, in cooperation with the non-governmental organization German AIDS Aid. The problems are analyzed by using discourse analysis. Therefore the main posters of every campaign were chosen as material. Risk communication theory offers an ideal theoretical foundation for this study. Different aspects, like trustworthiness, amount of information, narratives and models of risk communication are critically introduced. Relating this to the campaigns, the discourse analysis shows that HIV/AIDS is communicated in different ways. In both cases risk is at first place communicated as risk of discrimination and stigmatization. It is concentrated on values rather than safety or health issues. The first campaigns points towards awareness of the theme in society and reinforces passive support, whereas the second one aims towards solidarity and generates sympathy, tolerance, active support, respect and compassion. In both campaigns it is difficult to identify social groups with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS who are clearly targeted. Instead the society as a whole is targeted. (Less)
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author
Lyubenov, Lyuben LU
supervisor
organization
course
WPMM42 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
AIDS, HIV, campaigns, risk communication, Germany, social groups
language
English
id
2543592
date added to LUP
2012-06-25 14:43:48
date last changed
2012-06-25 14:43:48
@misc{2543592,
  abstract     = {Nowadays, the number of people infected with HIV/AIDS keeps rising in many countries. How can this risk be managed in society is an issue that gains on relevance. This paper focuses on the topic, how risk is communicated to society in the case of HIV/AIDS in Germany. It also looks at what aspects are emphasized and if different social groups are represented. Two nation-wide campaigns in Germany from 2009 and 2010 are analyzed. The key organizations are the Federal Centre for Health Education, in cooperation with the non-governmental organization German AIDS Aid. The problems are analyzed by using discourse analysis. Therefore the main posters of every campaign were chosen as material. Risk communication theory offers an ideal theoretical foundation for this study. Different aspects, like trustworthiness, amount of information, narratives and models of risk communication are critically introduced. Relating this to the campaigns, the discourse analysis shows that HIV/AIDS is communicated in different ways. In both cases risk is at first place communicated as risk of discrimination and stigmatization. It is concentrated on values rather than safety or health issues. The first campaigns points towards awareness of the theme in society and reinforces passive support, whereas the second one aims towards solidarity and generates sympathy, tolerance, active support, respect and compassion. In both campaigns it is difficult to identify social groups with high prevalence of HIV/AIDS who are clearly targeted. Instead the society as a whole is targeted.},
  author       = {Lyubenov, Lyuben},
  keyword      = {AIDS,HIV,campaigns,risk communication,Germany,social groups},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {How is HIV/AIDS communicated as a risk for society?},
  year         = {2012},
}