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Enhancing Women's Representation in Liberian Parliament

Boyle, Julia LU (2012) MIDM71 20121
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
In 2011, Liberia saw a drop in women’s representation in Parliament from 14% to 11.65%. In an effort to understand and aid in reversing this declining trend, this thesis aims to highlight the barriers to and strategies for enhancing women’s participation in the Liberian Parliament. To accomplish this goal 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed via academic and context-specific documents, and a 3-part theoretical framework. Findings show that women progress through the first two transitions of the legislative recruitment process at a lower rate than men due to supply-led barriers in the first transition which include lack of ambition, education, resources and media access, and demand-led barriers which include lack of... (More)
In 2011, Liberia saw a drop in women’s representation in Parliament from 14% to 11.65%. In an effort to understand and aid in reversing this declining trend, this thesis aims to highlight the barriers to and strategies for enhancing women’s participation in the Liberian Parliament. To accomplish this goal 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed via academic and context-specific documents, and a 3-part theoretical framework. Findings show that women progress through the first two transitions of the legislative recruitment process at a lower rate than men due to supply-led barriers in the first transition which include lack of ambition, education, resources and media access, and demand-led barriers which include lack of political party and constituent support in the second transition. This is largely the result of the lack of presence women and girls have in the public sphere, media agencies, political parties and legislature. As such, strategies to enhance gender representation in Liberian Parliament must reinforce entry-points for women in decision-making positions outside the domestic sphere. (Less)
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author
Boyle, Julia LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM71 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
gender representation, women in politics, supply-demand model, feminism, private-public divide, legislative recruitment, critical mass, gender quota
language
English
id
2543624
date added to LUP
2012-06-21 17:58:32
date last changed
2012-06-21 17:58:32
@misc{2543624,
  abstract     = {In 2011, Liberia saw a drop in women’s representation in Parliament from 14% to 11.65%. In an effort to understand and aid in reversing this declining trend, this thesis aims to highlight the barriers to and strategies for enhancing women’s participation in the Liberian Parliament. To accomplish this goal 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed via academic and context-specific documents, and a 3-part theoretical framework. Findings show that women progress through the first two transitions of the legislative recruitment process at a lower rate than men due to supply-led barriers in the first transition which include lack of ambition, education, resources and media access, and demand-led barriers which include lack of political party and constituent support in the second transition. This is largely the result of the lack of presence women and girls have in the public sphere, media agencies, political parties and legislature. As such, strategies to enhance gender representation in Liberian Parliament must reinforce entry-points for women in decision-making positions outside the domestic sphere.},
  author       = {Boyle, Julia},
  keyword      = {gender representation,women in politics,supply-demand model,feminism,private-public divide,legislative recruitment,critical mass,gender quota},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Enhancing Women's Representation in Liberian Parliament},
  year         = {2012},
}