Advanced

Public Works Programs as a Development Strategy for Marginalized Groups: A case study of tribal MNREGA-participants in Wayanad, Kerala

Rohne, Emelie LU (2012) EKHK18 20121
Department of Economic History
Abstract
In recent years, the practice of adopting Public Works Programs (PWPs) as a development strategy has increased in developing countries. Successful PWPs have the potential to act as a social protection scheme for the poor and stimulate their economic development. In 2006, the Indian government launched the yet largest PWP, as a way to create a more inclusive growth in the country – the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNREGA). As a PWP is most needed by the weakest sections of the society this study has grasped the opportunity to investigate how MNREGA is faring as a development strategy for one of the weakest sections of the Indian society, the Scheduled Tribes. Based on a qualitative field study in Wayanad – the... (More)
In recent years, the practice of adopting Public Works Programs (PWPs) as a development strategy has increased in developing countries. Successful PWPs have the potential to act as a social protection scheme for the poor and stimulate their economic development. In 2006, the Indian government launched the yet largest PWP, as a way to create a more inclusive growth in the country – the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNREGA). As a PWP is most needed by the weakest sections of the society this study has grasped the opportunity to investigate how MNREGA is faring as a development strategy for one of the weakest sections of the Indian society, the Scheduled Tribes. Based on a qualitative field study in Wayanad – the district with the largest tribal population in the South-Indian State Kerala – the study investigates how MNREGA is affecting the personal economic situation of its tribal participants. Through its qualitative approach the study sets out to understand the effects of MNREGA-participation in practice, an important factor to understand in order to understand the overall effects of the scheme. Within the focus of MNREGA as a PWP, three features have been given special emphasis: the wage level, the timing of the scheme and the outcome of ‘self-targeting’ in relation to access to the created assets of the program. The findings suggest that while MNREGA has succeeded in creating more work opportunities, the program is not optimally designed as a PWP concerning its too low wage level, and that the implementation falls short concerning the current poor timing throughout the year and inadequate creation of productive assets. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Rohne, Emelie LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHK18 20121
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
English
id
2726484
date added to LUP
2012-09-28 14:06:09
date last changed
2012-09-28 14:06:09
@misc{2726484,
  abstract     = {In recent years, the practice of adopting Public Works Programs (PWPs) as a development strategy has increased in developing countries. Successful PWPs have the potential to act as a social protection scheme for the poor and stimulate their economic development. In 2006, the Indian government launched the yet largest PWP, as a way to create a more inclusive growth in the country – the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MNREGA). As a PWP is most needed by the weakest sections of the society this study has grasped the opportunity to investigate how MNREGA is faring as a development strategy for one of the weakest sections of the Indian society, the Scheduled Tribes. Based on a qualitative field study in Wayanad – the district with the largest tribal population in the South-Indian State Kerala – the study investigates how MNREGA is affecting the personal economic situation of its tribal participants. Through its qualitative approach the study sets out to understand the effects of MNREGA-participation in practice, an important factor to understand in order to understand the overall effects of the scheme. Within the focus of MNREGA as a PWP, three features have been given special emphasis: the wage level, the timing of the scheme and the outcome of ‘self-targeting’ in relation to access to the created assets of the program. The findings suggest that while MNREGA has succeeded in creating more work opportunities, the program is not optimally designed as a PWP concerning its too low wage level, and that the implementation falls short concerning the current poor timing throughout the year and inadequate creation of productive assets.},
  author       = {Rohne, Emelie},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Public Works Programs as a Development Strategy for Marginalized Groups: A case study of tribal MNREGA-participants in Wayanad, Kerala},
  year         = {2012},
}