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Crowdsourcing Democracy? “Americans Elect” and Citizen Participation in the Digital Age

Pedroza, David LU (2012) SIMV05 20121
Graduate School
Abstract
As developed democracies experience a decrease in political engagement and a rise in the adoption of new communication technologies, new forms and models of citizen participation continue to emerge. This research paper has the objective of understanding how citizen participation is being affected by the widespread use of the Internet. In order to do so, a case study of the Americans Elect initiative is presented, using theories and concepts related to participation, including the public sphere, participation, voice, citizenship, deliberative democracy, democratic deficit as well as theories related to political communication. A discussion of these theories is presented with the aim of understanding whether and how they can be applied to... (More)
As developed democracies experience a decrease in political engagement and a rise in the adoption of new communication technologies, new forms and models of citizen participation continue to emerge. This research paper has the objective of understanding how citizen participation is being affected by the widespread use of the Internet. In order to do so, a case study of the Americans Elect initiative is presented, using theories and concepts related to participation, including the public sphere, participation, voice, citizenship, deliberative democracy, democratic deficit as well as theories related to political communication. A discussion of these theories is presented with the aim of understanding whether and how they can be applied to the context of citizen participation and the Internet. This issue is further explored by focusing on Dahlgren’s concept of civic cultures. The paper will also present a discussion on the concept of crowdsourcing, and how it can be applied to the Americans Elect initiative. Finally, considering the importance traditional media still has as an information provider, a discourse analysis of news stories related to Americans Elect is also presented. (Less)
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author
Pedroza, David LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV05 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
participation, democracy, crowdsourcing, Internet, elections, Americans Elect, media, communications, citizenship
language
English
id
2786707
date added to LUP
2012-06-13 10:42:53
date last changed
2012-06-13 10:42:53
@misc{2786707,
  abstract     = {As developed democracies experience a decrease in political engagement and a rise in the adoption of new communication technologies, new forms and models of citizen participation continue to emerge. This research paper has the objective of understanding how citizen participation is being affected by the widespread use of the Internet. In order to do so, a case study of the Americans Elect initiative is presented, using theories and concepts related to participation, including the public sphere, participation, voice, citizenship, deliberative democracy, democratic deficit as well as theories related to political communication. A discussion of these theories is presented with the aim of understanding whether and how they can be applied to the context of citizen participation and the Internet. This issue is further explored by focusing on Dahlgren’s concept of civic cultures. The paper will also present a discussion on the concept of crowdsourcing, and how it can be applied to the Americans Elect initiative. Finally, considering the importance traditional media still has as an information provider, a discourse analysis of news stories related to Americans Elect is also presented.},
  author       = {Pedroza, David},
  keyword      = {participation,democracy,crowdsourcing,Internet,elections,Americans Elect,media,communications,citizenship},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Crowdsourcing Democracy? “Americans Elect” and Citizen Participation in the Digital Age},
  year         = {2012},
}