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Evaluating urban traffic planning schemes in their effect on air quality: A policy comparison between Stockholm’s congestion charges and Berlin’s low emission zone.

Schusser, Sandra LU (2012) EKHR92 20121
Department of Economic History
Abstract
Despite the large theoretical corpus on approaches to dealing with negative externalities of road transport, there is a remarkable lack of connection to practically implemented road transport schemes.
This thesis gives two implemented road transport management systems, the congestion charging scheme as introduced in Stockholm and the low emission zone as introduced in Berlin, their place in the literature on negative externalities in road use. The need for a more differentiated evaluation and valuation of their effects on air quality is discussed by comparing analyses of air quality developments in the two cities, and by suggesting a life satisfaction approach to environmental quality in the analysis of the effectiveness of environmental... (More)
Despite the large theoretical corpus on approaches to dealing with negative externalities of road transport, there is a remarkable lack of connection to practically implemented road transport schemes.
This thesis gives two implemented road transport management systems, the congestion charging scheme as introduced in Stockholm and the low emission zone as introduced in Berlin, their place in the literature on negative externalities in road use. The need for a more differentiated evaluation and valuation of their effects on air quality is discussed by comparing analyses of air quality developments in the two cities, and by suggesting a life satisfaction approach to environmental quality in the analysis of the effectiveness of environmental transport schemes. The evaluation is then related to possibilities to ascertain public support. I find that integrated planning schemes, like the congestion charging scheme, that address transport demand over various channels and incentivize road users to change their travel behavior in the long run, promise higher improvements of air quality than single-minded schemes like the low emission zones. (Less)
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author
Schusser, Sandra LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHR92 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
externalities, road transport, air quality
language
English
id
2798855
date added to LUP
2012-08-07 11:57:46
date last changed
2012-08-07 11:57:46
@misc{2798855,
  abstract     = {Despite the large theoretical corpus on approaches to dealing with negative externalities of road transport, there is a remarkable lack of connection to practically implemented road transport schemes.
This thesis gives two implemented road transport management systems, the congestion charging scheme as introduced in Stockholm and the low emission zone as introduced in Berlin, their place in the literature on negative externalities in road use. The need for a more differentiated evaluation and valuation of their effects on air quality is discussed by comparing analyses of air quality developments in the two cities, and by suggesting a life satisfaction approach to environmental quality in the analysis of the effectiveness of environmental transport schemes. The evaluation is then related to possibilities to ascertain public support. I find that integrated planning schemes, like the congestion charging scheme, that address transport demand over various channels and incentivize road users to change their travel behavior in the long run, promise higher improvements of air quality than single-minded schemes like the low emission zones.},
  author       = {Schusser, Sandra},
  keyword      = {externalities,road transport,air quality},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Evaluating urban traffic planning schemes in their effect on air quality: A policy comparison between Stockholm’s congestion charges and Berlin’s low emission zone.},
  year         = {2012},
}