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Wasted energy : unlocking the biogas potential in Trinidad and Tobago : a transition theory perspective

Gardiner, Keima LU (2012) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM01 20121
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Trinidad and Tobago is heavily dependent on fossil fuels and the attendant challenges from its consumption have sparked a growing interest in the capacity of renewable energies to remedy some of these issues. Biogas has been earmarked as one possible alternative, particularly in light of the problems with waste management however, efforts to initiate its usage have been negligible. This study therefore aims to explore how biogas production can be integrated locally to alleviate these problems. The assessment is empirically illustrated with a qualitative, single case study based on the Beetham Landfill, with input from documents, interviews and observations. The Transition Theory based on the Multi-Level Perspective provided the analytical... (More)
Trinidad and Tobago is heavily dependent on fossil fuels and the attendant challenges from its consumption have sparked a growing interest in the capacity of renewable energies to remedy some of these issues. Biogas has been earmarked as one possible alternative, particularly in light of the problems with waste management however, efforts to initiate its usage have been negligible. This study therefore aims to explore how biogas production can be integrated locally to alleviate these problems. The assessment is empirically illustrated with a qualitative, single case study based on the Beetham Landfill, with input from documents, interviews and observations. The Transition Theory based on the Multi-Level Perspective provided the analytical framework and through it the key driving forces and barriers of this transition process were determined. To overcome the current fossil fuel ‘lock-in’, the transformation in the energy sector was found to involve a dual transition in both the energy and waste sectors. Further to this Trinidad and Tobago was aligned with a reconfiguration transition pathway, which contrary to the theoretical convention is a regime-based transition. It was recommended that these regime actors facilitate financial inducements, enabling environments and societal changes to activate the process. Strategic Niche Management was identified be a suitable and useful management tool for steering this process and broader scale linkages with strong sustainability were also established. It is anticipated that collectively, these elements can contribute to the transition to a sustainably oriented energy system. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Gardiner, Keima LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM01 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
sustainability science, municipal solid waste, Trinidad and Tobago, biogas, transition theory, renewable energy, Beetham Landfill
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2012:023
language
English
id
2966383
date added to LUP
2012-08-07 15:17:08
date last changed
2012-11-26 10:22:11
@misc{2966383,
  abstract     = {Trinidad and Tobago is heavily dependent on fossil fuels and the attendant challenges from its consumption have sparked a growing interest in the capacity of renewable energies to remedy some of these issues. Biogas has been earmarked as one possible alternative, particularly in light of the problems with waste management however, efforts to initiate its usage have been negligible. This study therefore aims to explore how biogas production can be integrated locally to alleviate these problems. The assessment is empirically illustrated with a qualitative, single case study based on the Beetham Landfill, with input from documents, interviews and observations. The Transition Theory based on the Multi-Level Perspective provided the analytical framework and through it the key driving forces and barriers of this transition process were determined. To overcome the current fossil fuel ‘lock-in’, the transformation in the energy sector was found to involve a dual transition in both the energy and waste sectors. Further to this Trinidad and Tobago was aligned with a reconfiguration transition pathway, which contrary to the theoretical convention is a regime-based transition. It was recommended that these regime actors facilitate financial inducements, enabling environments and societal changes to activate the process. Strategic Niche Management was identified be a suitable and useful management tool for steering this process and broader scale linkages with strong sustainability were also established. It is anticipated that collectively, these elements can contribute to the transition to a sustainably oriented energy system.},
  author       = {Gardiner, Keima},
  keyword      = {sustainability science,municipal solid waste,Trinidad and Tobago,biogas,transition theory,renewable energy,Beetham Landfill},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Wasted energy : unlocking the biogas potential in Trinidad and Tobago : a transition theory perspective},
  year         = {2012},
}