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A case study of the precedence effect in a sample of auditory hallucinating schizophrenics

Fristedt Nehlstedt, Sara (2004) AUD414 20041
Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology
Abstract
In a reverberant environment, a direct sound is followed by several reflections. -As a
result, we are often presented with multiple signals coming from different directions.
Yet we are normally aware of just the first sound, the direct sound, and are able to tell
the direction of it's source. This is due to a phenomenon called the precedence effect,
also called the "law of the first wavefront". Earlier studies have shown that
schizophrenic individuals have dysfunctions in their ability to localize sounds. The
aims of this study where to contribute to the survey of sound localization by studying
the precedence effect with auditory brainstem response (ABR) on hallucinating
schizophrenics and healthy individuals. It was assumed that... (More)
In a reverberant environment, a direct sound is followed by several reflections. -As a
result, we are often presented with multiple signals coming from different directions.
Yet we are normally aware of just the first sound, the direct sound, and are able to tell
the direction of it's source. This is due to a phenomenon called the precedence effect,
also called the "law of the first wavefront". Earlier studies have shown that
schizophrenic individuals have dysfunctions in their ability to localize sounds. The
aims of this study where to contribute to the survey of sound localization by studying
the precedence effect with auditory brainstem response (ABR) on hallucinating
schizophrenics and healthy individuals. It was assumed that schizophrenic subjects may
show aberrations in the function of the precedence effect. For this report, the
precedence effect was studied in two schizophrenic individuals by recording the
auditory brain stem response as a result of sound stimulation. The main finding is an
increased amplitude of the precedence effect in wave V, originating from the inferior
colliculus (I C), compared to the healthy subjects.
The schizophrenics aberrant amplitude can perhaps be explained as dysfunctions on
a psychophysiological level. (Less)
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author
Fristedt Nehlstedt, Sara
supervisor
organization
course
AUD414 20041
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
language
English
id
2969209
date added to LUP
2012-08-08 17:04:34
date last changed
2012-08-08 17:04:34
@misc{2969209,
  abstract     = {In a reverberant environment, a direct sound is followed by several reflections. -As a
result, we are often presented with multiple signals coming from different directions.
Yet we are normally aware of just the first sound, the direct sound, and are able to tell
the direction of it's source. This is due to a phenomenon called the precedence effect,
also called the "law of the first wavefront". Earlier studies have shown that
schizophrenic individuals have dysfunctions in their ability to localize sounds. The
aims of this study where to contribute to the survey of sound localization by studying
the precedence effect with auditory brainstem response (ABR) on hallucinating
schizophrenics and healthy individuals. It was assumed that schizophrenic subjects may
show aberrations in the function of the precedence effect. For this report, the
precedence effect was studied in two schizophrenic individuals by recording the
auditory brain stem response as a result of sound stimulation. The main finding is an
increased amplitude of the precedence effect in wave V, originating from the inferior
colliculus (I C), compared to the healthy subjects.
The schizophrenics aberrant amplitude can perhaps be explained as dysfunctions on
a psychophysiological level.},
  author       = {Fristedt Nehlstedt, Sara},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A case study of the precedence effect in a sample of auditory hallucinating schizophrenics},
  year         = {2004},
}