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The Dissolution of the Family. A Consequence of Misinterpretation?

Veith, Theresa LU (2012) SIMV10 20121
Graduate School
Abstract
Problem/Background: Even though individualizing tendencies can be dated back at least to the industrial revolution, the 1950s and 1960s are understood as a climax of the process due to the emergence of certain opportunities. Mainly because of individualization, characterized by the emphasis on self-fulfilment and impersonality for instance, a general apprehension towards a dissolving family has risen.
Objective: The aim of this research is to investigate whether this apprehension is valid. This is conducted through two different approaches, i.e. an implementation of the relativist perspective and a historical analysis. A comparison of three concepts since the 1980s not only demonstrates a change or no change in the understanding of... (More)
Problem/Background: Even though individualizing tendencies can be dated back at least to the industrial revolution, the 1950s and 1960s are understood as a climax of the process due to the emergence of certain opportunities. Mainly because of individualization, characterized by the emphasis on self-fulfilment and impersonality for instance, a general apprehension towards a dissolving family has risen.
Objective: The aim of this research is to investigate whether this apprehension is valid. This is conducted through two different approaches, i.e. an implementation of the relativist perspective and a historical analysis. A comparison of three concepts since the 1980s not only demonstrates a change or no change in the understanding of family in recent years, but also a potential variety of perspectives. The investigation is based on the assumption that as long as pro-familial concepts exist, the suggestion of dissolution of the family can be rendered obsolete on a general basis. The research not only examines the dissolution of the family but also the power of the relativist perspective to reject certain concepts.
First the relativist perspective is presented followed by a demonstration of the theoretical framework of the research, i.e. the individualization theory. The investigation then offers an insight into the historical background, namely post-war modernism, and a characterization of reflexive modernization, which constitutes the examined time frame. After a clarification of the methodological procedure and the actual comparison the outcome is refined by empirical data, which consists of the understanding of family by individuals themselves.
Conclusion/result: The individualization process has caused an expansion of the term family, which increasingly included non-familial persons as well. However, the term still involves the family of origin, which consequently has neither dissolved nor experienced a decrease in value. (Less)
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author
Veith, Theresa LU
supervisor
organization
course
SIMV10 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
family, individualization theory, relativist perspective, reflexive modernization
language
English
id
3046644
date added to LUP
2012-09-17 12:08:23
date last changed
2012-09-17 12:08:23
@misc{3046644,
  abstract     = {Problem/Background: Even though individualizing tendencies can be dated back at least to the industrial revolution, the 1950s and 1960s are understood as a climax of the process due to the emergence of certain opportunities. Mainly because of individualization, characterized by the emphasis on self-fulfilment and impersonality for instance, a general apprehension towards a dissolving family has risen. 
Objective: The aim of this research is to investigate whether this apprehension is valid. This is conducted through two different approaches, i.e. an implementation of the relativist perspective and a historical analysis. A comparison of three concepts since the 1980s not only demonstrates a change or no change in the understanding of family in recent years, but also a potential variety of perspectives. The investigation is based on the assumption that as long as pro-familial concepts exist, the suggestion of dissolution of the family can be rendered obsolete on a general basis. The research not only examines the dissolution of the family but also the power of the relativist perspective to reject certain concepts. 
First the relativist perspective is presented followed by a demonstration of the theoretical framework of the research, i.e. the individualization theory. The investigation then offers an insight into the historical background, namely post-war modernism, and a characterization of reflexive modernization, which constitutes the examined time frame. After a clarification of the methodological procedure and the actual comparison the outcome is refined by empirical data, which consists of the understanding of family by individuals themselves.
Conclusion/result: The individualization process has caused an expansion of the term family, which increasingly included non-familial persons as well. However, the term still involves the family of origin, which consequently has neither dissolved nor experienced a decrease in value.},
  author       = {Veith, Theresa},
  keyword      = {family,individualization theory,relativist perspective,reflexive modernization},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Dissolution of the Family. A Consequence of Misinterpretation?},
  year         = {2012},
}