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Retrograde motion in the carotid artery wall, the impact of left ventricle movement of the heart

Persson, Roger LU (2012) EEML01 20112
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, is a major cause of mortality in, primarily, the western world. To be able to recognize early symptoms of this type of diseases it has proven to be important to investigate the mechanical properties of blood vessels. A few years back from now it became evident that the common carotid artery has a distinct bidirectional movement pattern in the longitudinal direction during each cardiac cycle. The mechanisms of this behavior has however since then been undetermined. In this study three independent indicators of the cardiac wall movements’ involvement is presented.
By ultrasound examinations of both the right and left side common carotids and simultaneous examinations of left ventricle... (More)
Cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, is a major cause of mortality in, primarily, the western world. To be able to recognize early symptoms of this type of diseases it has proven to be important to investigate the mechanical properties of blood vessels. A few years back from now it became evident that the common carotid artery has a distinct bidirectional movement pattern in the longitudinal direction during each cardiac cycle. The mechanisms of this behavior has however since then been undetermined. In this study three independent indicators of the cardiac wall movements’ involvement is presented.
By ultrasound examinations of both the right and left side common carotids and simultaneous examinations of left ventricle movement of the heart of 14 humans it has become evident that:
The longitudinal movement in the carotid arterial wall, in both directions, occurs in parts of the vessel close to the heart before it is transmitted to more peripheral parts of the vessel.
In every instance, the movement of the heart precedes the movement in the carotids.
The motion forward on the right side carotid occurs before the motion forward on the left side.
All these peaces of evidence suggests that the heart’s movement is the mother of, or at least significantly involved in, the longitudinal motion in the carotid arterial walls. (Less)
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author
Persson, Roger LU
supervisor
organization
course
EEML01 20112
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
language
English
id
3051799
date added to LUP
2012-09-11 09:01:01
date last changed
2014-10-08 14:47:02
@misc{3051799,
  abstract     = {Cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, is a major cause of mortality in, primarily, the western world. To be able to recognize early symptoms of this type of diseases it has proven to be important to investigate the mechanical properties of blood vessels. A few years back from now it became evident that the common carotid artery has a distinct bidirectional movement pattern in the longitudinal direction during each cardiac cycle. The mechanisms of this behavior has however since then been undetermined. In this study three independent indicators of the cardiac wall movements’ involvement is presented.
By ultrasound examinations of both the right and left side common carotids and simultaneous examinations of left ventricle movement of the heart of 14 humans it has become evident that:
The longitudinal movement in the carotid arterial wall, in both directions, occurs in parts of the vessel close to the heart before it is transmitted to more peripheral parts of the vessel.
In every instance, the movement of the heart precedes the movement in the carotids.
The motion forward on the right side carotid occurs before the motion forward on the left side.
All these peaces of evidence suggests that the heart’s movement is the mother of, or at least significantly involved in, the longitudinal motion in the carotid arterial walls.},
  author       = {Persson, Roger},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Retrograde motion in the carotid artery wall, the impact of left ventricle movement of the heart},
  year         = {2012},
}