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Effects of visual feedback on the temporal aspects of argumentative writing

Mirkoska, Vesna LU (2012) SPVR01 20121
Master's Programme: Language and Linguistics
Abstract
The effects of visual feedback in writing have mainly been investigated in the context of L1 handwriting and findings generally point to the detrimental effects of visual suppression, in terms of lower quality of the text, shorter clauses and lack of coherence. An investigation of visual feedback effects in computer-based L2 text production has not been undertaken yet. More specifically, findings indicate that visual feedback in L2 provides a release for the limited working memory in L2. In addition, while producing argumentative text, links need to be established between arguments. This makes the role of visual feedback critical. Given the relationship established between pause duration and working memory demands, suppression of visual... (More)
The effects of visual feedback in writing have mainly been investigated in the context of L1 handwriting and findings generally point to the detrimental effects of visual suppression, in terms of lower quality of the text, shorter clauses and lack of coherence. An investigation of visual feedback effects in computer-based L2 text production has not been undertaken yet. More specifically, findings indicate that visual feedback in L2 provides a release for the limited working memory in L2. In addition, while producing argumentative text, links need to be established between arguments. This makes the role of visual feedback critical. Given the relationship established between pause duration and working memory demands, suppression of visual feedback is expected to influence the temporal patterns of text production. Against this backdrop, the present exploratory study investigated the effect of visual feedback on the temporal variables of pause duration, pause location, pause frequency, and pause distribution as well as the aspects of fluency during the production of English L2 argumentative texts. In a within-subjects study, 14 English L2 participants produced argumentative texts in a condition with visual feedback and in a condition with restricted visual feedback. Data were collected with ScriptLog, a keystroke logging programme. 28 texts were coded for pauses on three levels: meta-textual level (text, movement, editing), textual (Introduction, Arguments for and against and Conclusion) and syntactic (clause and phrase). Two analyses were performed based on two pause location definitions. The first analysis defined location of the pause before the specified units, whereas the second defined location after the designated units. An exception to the dual analysis was the textual level. Results of the paired t-test(s) show that when visual feedback is restricted, frequency and duration scores for pauses at movement locations increase significantly. At editing locations, however, frequency and duration scores significantly decrease. Second, writers spend significantly less pause time in the introductory part but pause more while they produce arguments against. Third, results indicate that frequency scores are significantly higher at clause final and phrase internal locations. Finally, while fluency remained constant, wasted characters were lower in the restricted feedback condition. To conclude, manipulating visual feedback alters the temporal aspects of L2 writing but does not necessarily produce detrimental effects. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Mirkoska, Vesna LU
supervisor
organization
course
SPVR01 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
visual feedback, pause, argumentative text production
language
English
id
3124718
date added to LUP
2012-10-02 11:57:27
date last changed
2012-10-02 11:57:27
@misc{3124718,
  abstract     = {The effects of visual feedback in writing have mainly been investigated in the context of L1 handwriting and findings generally point to the detrimental effects of visual suppression, in terms of lower quality of the text, shorter clauses and lack of coherence. An investigation of visual feedback effects in computer-based L2 text production has not been undertaken yet. More specifically, findings indicate that visual feedback in L2 provides a release for the limited working memory in L2. In addition, while producing argumentative text, links need to be established between arguments. This makes the role of visual feedback critical. Given the relationship established between pause duration and working memory demands, suppression of visual feedback is expected to influence the temporal patterns of text production. Against this backdrop, the present exploratory study investigated the effect of visual feedback on the temporal variables of pause duration, pause location, pause frequency, and pause distribution as well as the aspects of fluency during the production of English L2 argumentative texts. In a within-subjects study, 14 English L2 participants produced argumentative texts in a condition with visual feedback and in a condition with restricted visual feedback. Data were collected with ScriptLog, a keystroke logging programme. 28 texts were coded for pauses on three levels: meta-textual level (text, movement, editing), textual (Introduction, Arguments for and against and Conclusion) and syntactic (clause and phrase). Two analyses were performed based on two pause location definitions. The first analysis defined location of the pause before the specified units, whereas the second defined location after the designated units. An exception to the dual analysis was the textual level. Results of the paired t-test(s) show that when visual feedback is restricted, frequency and duration scores for pauses at movement locations increase significantly. At editing locations, however, frequency and duration scores significantly decrease. Second, writers spend significantly less pause time in the introductory part but pause more while they produce arguments against. Third, results indicate that frequency scores are significantly higher at clause final and phrase internal locations. Finally, while fluency remained constant, wasted characters were lower in the restricted feedback condition. To conclude, manipulating visual feedback alters the temporal aspects of L2 writing but does not necessarily produce detrimental effects.},
  author       = {Mirkoska, Vesna},
  keyword      = {visual feedback,pause,argumentative text production},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Effects of visual feedback on the temporal aspects of argumentative writing},
  year         = {2012},
}