Advanced

APIVARIA - A Top Bar Bee Hive Concept

Jönsson, Maria (2012) In Diploma work IDEM01 20121
Industrial Design
Abstract (Swedish)
A concept for a bee, - and beekeeper friendly horizontal top bar beehive for northern climates, aiming to provide a platform for discussion and further development of bee keeping methods.
An ergonomic alternative to the heavy handled traditionally used vertical hives, Apivaria aims to offer an older generation a possibility to postpone retirement from beekeeping, while introducing a new generation of beekeepers to small scale beekeeping.
The practice of beekeeping have varied little in Sweden and as it seems, in large parts of the world, during the last centuries. This despite the changed climate of agriculture, affecting the roles of bees and keepers in society. The rising awareness of the importance of biodiversity opens up new... (More)
A concept for a bee, - and beekeeper friendly horizontal top bar beehive for northern climates, aiming to provide a platform for discussion and further development of bee keeping methods.
An ergonomic alternative to the heavy handled traditionally used vertical hives, Apivaria aims to offer an older generation a possibility to postpone retirement from beekeeping, while introducing a new generation of beekeepers to small scale beekeeping.
The practice of beekeeping have varied little in Sweden and as it seems, in large parts of the world, during the last centuries. This despite the changed climate of agriculture, affecting the roles of bees and keepers in society. The rising awareness of the importance of biodiversity opens up new possibilities: bees are the most important pollinators of plants in the world, increasing crops and ensuring biological multitude. Adding to the relevance of the project, the number of honey bee colonies are declining - a probable side effect of modern agriculture methods calling for alternative measures.
Based on a minimalist top bar hive model originated in Kenya and adapted to a northern European climate and market, Apivaria follows the principles of what is commonly known as ‘natural’ or ‘organic’ beekeeping. This small scale method is unconventional in Europe, but appears to increase in popularity amongst alternative beekeepers in the United States. The sustainable approach leaves less honey to harvest but is argued to boost the bees immune system, making bees less susceptible to health threats in the long run. Instead of following traditional practice and replacing nutritious honey with sugar syrup in the autumn, the honey is left for the bees winter feed, and the leftovers harvested in spring.
Equipped with observation windows and sliding doors, Apivaria also allows the keeper to monitor the bees without disturbing the colony. Showcasing the fascinating, social hobby of beekeeping, the windows also offer curious onlookers a view of beautiful free build natural honey comb. Top bars are used instead of the traditional frames, allowing the bees to construct the organic shapes they would in the wild while still affording handling of individual combs
Attempting to minimize harm to nature throughout the life cycle of the product has been an important part of the project. Apivaria is meant to be built in local materials and meant to last over time. Likewise the form aspires to be timeless and simplistic, balancing curiosity and respect in an object intended to direct focus to the content while blending with surrounding nature and architecture.
Presented as a full scale prototype and 3d computer renderings, the Apivaria concept is a result of research, ideation and creation during an approximate year long period. Primarily, four beekeepers were openly interviewed in field studies and discussions on international beekeeping forums have been followed through online research. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Jönsson, Maria
supervisor
organization
course
IDEM01 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
Diploma work
report number
ISRN: LUT-DVIDE/ EX--12/50157—SE
ISSN
ISRN
language
English
id
3168710
date added to LUP
2012-11-15 16:36:40
date last changed
2012-11-15 16:36:40
@misc{3168710,
  abstract     = {A concept for a bee, - and beekeeper friendly horizontal top bar beehive for northern climates, aiming to provide a platform for discussion and further development of bee keeping methods.
An ergonomic alternative to the heavy handled traditionally used vertical hives, Apivaria aims to offer an older generation a possibility to postpone retirement from beekeeping, while introducing a new generation of beekeepers to small scale beekeeping.
The practice of beekeeping have varied little in Sweden and as it seems, in large parts of the world, during the last centuries. This despite the changed climate of agriculture, affecting the roles of bees and keepers in society. The rising awareness of the importance of biodiversity opens up new possibilities: bees are the most important pollinators of plants in the world, increasing crops and ensuring biological multitude. Adding to the relevance of the project, the number of honey bee colonies are declining - a probable side effect of modern agriculture methods calling for alternative measures.
Based on a minimalist top bar hive model originated in Kenya and adapted to a northern European climate and market, Apivaria follows the principles of what is commonly known as ‘natural’ or ‘organic’ beekeeping. This small scale method is unconventional in Europe, but appears to increase in popularity amongst alternative beekeepers in the United States. The sustainable approach leaves less honey to harvest but is argued to boost the bees immune system, making bees less susceptible to health threats in the long run. Instead of following traditional practice and replacing nutritious honey with sugar syrup in the autumn, the honey is left for the bees winter feed, and the leftovers harvested in spring.
Equipped with observation windows and sliding doors, Apivaria also allows the keeper to monitor the bees without disturbing the colony. Showcasing the fascinating, social hobby of beekeeping, the windows also offer curious onlookers a view of beautiful free build natural honey comb. Top bars are used instead of the traditional frames, allowing the bees to construct the organic shapes they would in the wild while still affording handling of individual combs
Attempting to minimize harm to nature throughout the life cycle of the product has been an important part of the project. Apivaria is meant to be built in local materials and meant to last over time. Likewise the form aspires to be timeless and simplistic, balancing curiosity and respect in an object intended to direct focus to the content while blending with surrounding nature and architecture.
Presented as a full scale prototype and 3d computer renderings, the Apivaria concept is a result of research, ideation and creation during an approximate year long period. Primarily, four beekeepers were openly interviewed in field studies and discussions on international beekeeping forums have been followed through online research.},
  author       = {Jönsson, Maria},
  issn         = {ISRN},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Diploma work},
  title        = {APIVARIA - A Top Bar Bee Hive Concept},
  year         = {2012},
}