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Rop på hjälp i GT/Tanak

Järlemyr, Sara LU (2013) TEOK51 20122
Centre for Theology and Religious Studies
Abstract
This thesis is a terminological study of the Hebrew word s'q. There is an idea among some scholars that the people who heard someone cry using either the Hebrew word for “help!” or “violence!”, was obligated by law to help them. The cry is described with the word s'q. The helper is called “savior”. In this thesis I seek to find out if this idea is merely a moral code or if the law in Tanakh supports this idea. Two scholars are especially important in my thesis. The first one is H.J Boecker, who links this tradition of the “hue and cry” to a medieval Germanic legal institution called the Zeterruf/Zetergeschrei. This medieval law seems to be applied in the same way as the idea in Tanakh that I referred to above. The second scholar, R.N.... (More)
This thesis is a terminological study of the Hebrew word s'q. There is an idea among some scholars that the people who heard someone cry using either the Hebrew word for “help!” or “violence!”, was obligated by law to help them. The cry is described with the word s'q. The helper is called “savior”. In this thesis I seek to find out if this idea is merely a moral code or if the law in Tanakh supports this idea. Two scholars are especially important in my thesis. The first one is H.J Boecker, who links this tradition of the “hue and cry” to a medieval Germanic legal institution called the Zeterruf/Zetergeschrei. This medieval law seems to be applied in the same way as the idea in Tanakh that I referred to above. The second scholar, R.N. Boyce, is of another opinion. He believes that the cry is a cry for legal assistance or legal protection that is directed from the legally marginalized to the king. Those who had limited rights in the ordinary legal institution, mainly women according to Boyce, had this opportunity to use this cry for help. They would then use similar terminology as to the one referred to above. The cry is directed to an influential person, often the king himself. In my thesis I compare these two different positions, and use the passages of Tanakh that they build their arguments on to find out which one of the two scholars is most likely to be right. My conclusion is that the Zeterruf is an unfortunate name for the idea. To say that a medieval Germanic law has its roots in a tradition that may or may not have existed 1600 years before keeps us more occupied with the German legal-system than with the Hebrew bible. Boyce’s idea about the legally marginalized’s approach to the king, and the cry for help as a social welfare system is, I believe, closer to the truth. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Järlemyr, Sara LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
צָעַק /זָעַק en terminologisk studie
course
TEOK51 20122
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
rop, hjälp, Zeterruf, frälsare, hebreiska, JHWH.
language
Swedish
id
3405920
date added to LUP
2013-01-23 10:04:10
date last changed
2013-01-23 10:04:10
@misc{3405920,
  abstract     = {This thesis is a terminological study of the Hebrew word s'q. There is an idea among some scholars that the people who heard someone cry using either the Hebrew word for “help!” or “violence!”, was obligated by law to help them. The cry is described with the word s'q. The helper is called “savior”. In this thesis I seek to find out if this idea is merely a moral code or if the law in Tanakh supports this idea. Two scholars are especially important in my thesis. The first one is H.J Boecker, who links this tradition of the “hue and cry” to a medieval Germanic legal institution called the Zeterruf/Zetergeschrei. This medieval law seems to be applied in the same way as the idea in Tanakh that I referred to above. The second scholar, R.N. Boyce, is of another opinion. He believes that the cry is a cry for legal assistance or legal protection that is directed from the legally marginalized to the king. Those who had limited rights in the ordinary legal institution, mainly women according to Boyce, had this opportunity to use this cry for help. They would then use similar terminology as to the one referred to above. The cry is directed to an influential person, often the king himself. In my thesis I compare these two different positions, and use the passages of Tanakh that they build their arguments on to find out which one of the two scholars is most likely to be right. My conclusion is that the Zeterruf is an unfortunate name for the idea. To say that a medieval Germanic law has its roots in a tradition that may or may not have existed 1600 years before keeps us more occupied with the German legal-system than with the Hebrew bible. Boyce’s idea about the legally marginalized’s approach to the king, and the cry for help as a social welfare system is, I believe, closer to the truth.},
  author       = {Järlemyr, Sara},
  keyword      = {rop,hjälp,Zeterruf,frälsare,hebreiska,JHWH.},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Rop på hjälp i GT/Tanak},
  year         = {2013},
}