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LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Proportionality in Election Systems

Lantz, Magnus LU (2013) NEKN01 20122
Department of Economics
Abstract
Purpose
This essay introduces first an overview over the most
common election systems and, in particular the
Swedish election system. The main purpose is then
to examine how well the current system in Sweden
performs with respect to proportionality and then to
analyse how a more proportional system can be
achieved.

Method
The Swedish election system is analysed using a
computer simulation method. Based on a large
number of simulated election outcomes is the degree
of proportionality examined. In the simulations take
the main values of the Swedish election system,
namely the number of constituencies, the numbers of
adjustment seats and the most important value in the
technique of distributing mandates, different values.
... (More)
Purpose
This essay introduces first an overview over the most
common election systems and, in particular the
Swedish election system. The main purpose is then
to examine how well the current system in Sweden
performs with respect to proportionality and then to
analyse how a more proportional system can be
achieved.

Method
The Swedish election system is analysed using a
computer simulation method. Based on a large
number of simulated election outcomes is the degree
of proportionality examined. In the simulations take
the main values of the Swedish election system,
namely the number of constituencies, the numbers of
adjustment seats and the most important value in the
technique of distributing mandates, different values.
Conclusion: When the constituencies are of equal size, a number
of 10 to 15 constituencies give the most proportional
result. For the current distribution of constituencies, a
value between 1.2 and 1.3 on the first divisor is
preferred. A large number of adjustment seats leads
in general to a more proportional result. (Less)
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author
Lantz, Magnus LU
supervisor
organization
course
NEKN01 20122
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Voting, Election system, Proportionality, Simulation
language
English
id
3459416
date added to LUP
2013-02-14 08:52:59
date last changed
2013-02-14 08:52:59
@misc{3459416,
  abstract     = {Purpose
This essay introduces first an overview over the most
common election systems and, in particular the
Swedish election system. The main purpose is then
to examine how well the current system in Sweden
performs with respect to proportionality and then to
analyse how a more proportional system can be
achieved.

Method
The Swedish election system is analysed using a
computer simulation method. Based on a large
number of simulated election outcomes is the degree
of proportionality examined. In the simulations take
the main values of the Swedish election system,
namely the number of constituencies, the numbers of
adjustment seats and the most important value in the
technique of distributing mandates, different values.
Conclusion: When the constituencies are of equal size, a number
of 10 to 15 constituencies give the most proportional
result. For the current distribution of constituencies, a
value between 1.2 and 1.3 on the first divisor is
preferred. A large number of adjustment seats leads
in general to a more proportional result.},
  author       = {Lantz, Magnus},
  keyword      = {Voting,Election system,Proportionality,Simulation},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Proportionality in Election Systems},
  year         = {2013},
}