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Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from Willow trees

Mozaffar, Md. Ahsan LU (2013) In Student thesis series INES NGEM01 20131
Dept of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science
Abstract (Swedish)
In August 2012, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from willow (Salix) trees were measured in Lund, southern Sweden. Sweden has more than 16000 ha of short rotation willow plantations for biofuel production and willow trees are suspected to emit substantial amounts of BVOC to the atmosphere. BVOC emission measurements were carried out on two Salix fragilis trees and one Salix phylicifolia tree. The measurements were conducted using a dynamic flow through chamber covered with Teflon film. Salix trees were found to emit large amounts of isoprene. Especially Salix phylicifolia emitted 98% isoprene of total BVOC emission, whereas Salix fragilis trees released about 85% of the total BVOC mass as isoprene. Apart from... (More)
In August 2012, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from willow (Salix) trees were measured in Lund, southern Sweden. Sweden has more than 16000 ha of short rotation willow plantations for biofuel production and willow trees are suspected to emit substantial amounts of BVOC to the atmosphere. BVOC emission measurements were carried out on two Salix fragilis trees and one Salix phylicifolia tree. The measurements were conducted using a dynamic flow through chamber covered with Teflon film. Salix trees were found to emit large amounts of isoprene. Especially Salix phylicifolia emitted 98% isoprene of total BVOC emission, whereas Salix fragilis trees released about 85% of the total BVOC mass as isoprene. Apart from isoprene, willow trees were found to emit significant amounts of ocimene as well. Emission rates of different BVOCs were found to vary between different individuals of the same species of willow trees as well as between the subspecies of willow trees. Emissions of BVOCs were detected to depend on temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Isoprene emission potential for Salix phylicifolia was 56.4 µg g-1dw h-1 whereas 16.9 µg g-1dw h-1 and 44.4 µg g-1dw h-1 were measured for the Salix fragilis trees. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Popular science
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are a versatile group of non-methane hydrocarbons (chemical compounds made of carbon and hydrogen) emitted by vegetation. The most common BVOCs from plants are some chemical compounds like isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. BVOCs are involved in plant growth, reproduction and defense mechanisms. Besides, BVOC play an important role in tropospheric (lower portion of atmosphere) chemistry and could increase methane’s lifetime, form tropospheric ozone and increase CO2 concentration.

In August 2012, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from willow (Salix) trees were measured in Lund, southern Sweden. For the last 25 years willow has been cultivated as... (More)
Popular science
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are a versatile group of non-methane hydrocarbons (chemical compounds made of carbon and hydrogen) emitted by vegetation. The most common BVOCs from plants are some chemical compounds like isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. BVOCs are involved in plant growth, reproduction and defense mechanisms. Besides, BVOC play an important role in tropospheric (lower portion of atmosphere) chemistry and could increase methane’s lifetime, form tropospheric ozone and increase CO2 concentration.

In August 2012, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from willow (Salix) trees were measured in Lund, southern Sweden. For the last 25 years willow has been cultivated as an agricultural crop for bioenergy production and played an important role in Swedish energy sector by producing wood fuel. During this period, more than 16000 ha of short rotation willow plantations have been planted in Sweden. But willow trees are suspected to emit substantial amounts of BVOC to the atmosphere.

BVOC emission measurements were carried out on two Salix fragilis trees and one Salix phylicifolia tree. Emission rates of different BVOCs were found to vary between different individuals of the same species of willow trees as well as between the subspecies of willow trees. Emissions of BVOCs were detected to depend on temperature and light intensity. Salix trees were found to emit large amounts of isoprene. Especially Salix phylicifolia emitted 98% isoprene of total BVOC emission, whereas Salix fragilis trees released about 85% of the total BVOC mass as isoprene. But isoprene is an extremely reactive compound and reacts with other atmospheric gases. Isoprene emission potential for Salix phylicifolia was 56.4 µg g-1dw h-1 (microgram per gram dry weight of leaves per hour) whereas 16.9 µg g-1dw h-1 and 44.4 µg g-1dw h-1 were measured for the Salix fragilis trees. Isoprene emission potentials for Willows were higher compared to other vegetation. As isoprene is a highly reactive compound and has great impact on atmosphere and climate system, we should think about alternative bioenergy plants which emit less or no isoprene at all. Non-isoprene emitting poplars are an option for the future biofuel plantation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Mozaffar, Md. Ahsan LU
supervisor
organization
course
NGEM01 20131
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
atmosphere, Salix, Willow, biogenic volatile organic compounds, Isoprene, climate, BVOC, geography, physical geography
publication/series
Student thesis series INES
report number
269
language
English
id
3627154
date added to LUP
2013-04-02 10:33:48
date last changed
2013-04-02 10:33:48
@misc{3627154,
  abstract     = {Popular science
Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are a versatile group of non-methane hydrocarbons (chemical compounds made of carbon and hydrogen) emitted by vegetation. The most common BVOCs from plants are some chemical compounds like isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. BVOCs are involved in plant growth, reproduction and defense mechanisms. Besides, BVOC play an important role in tropospheric (lower portion of atmosphere) chemistry and could increase methane’s lifetime, form tropospheric ozone and increase CO2 concentration. 

In August 2012, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from willow (Salix) trees were measured in Lund, southern Sweden. For the last 25 years willow has been cultivated as an agricultural crop for bioenergy production and played an important role in Swedish energy sector by producing wood fuel. During this period, more than 16000 ha of short rotation willow plantations have been planted in Sweden. But willow trees are suspected to emit substantial amounts of BVOC to the atmosphere. 

BVOC emission measurements were carried out on two Salix fragilis trees and one Salix phylicifolia tree. Emission rates of different BVOCs were found to vary between different individuals of the same species of willow trees as well as between the subspecies of willow trees. Emissions of BVOCs were detected to depend on temperature and light intensity. Salix trees were found to emit large amounts of isoprene. Especially Salix phylicifolia emitted 98% isoprene of total BVOC emission, whereas Salix fragilis trees released about 85% of the total BVOC mass as isoprene. But isoprene is an extremely reactive compound and reacts with other atmospheric gases. Isoprene emission potential for Salix phylicifolia was 56.4 µg g-1dw h-1 (microgram per gram dry weight of leaves per hour) whereas 16.9 µg g-1dw h-1 and 44.4 µg g-1dw h-1 were measured for the Salix fragilis trees. Isoprene emission potentials for Willows were higher compared to other vegetation. As isoprene is a highly reactive compound and has great impact on atmosphere and climate system, we should think about alternative bioenergy plants which emit less or no isoprene at all. Non-isoprene emitting poplars are an option for the future biofuel plantation.},
  author       = {Mozaffar, Md. Ahsan},
  keyword      = {atmosphere,Salix,Willow,biogenic volatile organic compounds,Isoprene,climate,BVOC,geography,physical geography},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Student thesis series INES},
  title        = {Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from Willow trees},
  year         = {2013},
}