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More than Cars, Cash and Cellphones - Exploring Youth Perceptions on Intergenerational Transactional Relationships

Olofsgård, Lydia LU (2013) MIDM71 20131
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis was to contribute to a more holistic understanding of how youth reason around Intergenerational Transactional Relationships (ITRs) by moving beyond the customarily analysis of youths’ motivations for the engagement. Empirical data was gained through qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with youth in Windhoek. Informants’ accounts were analyzed against an analytical framework inspired by the integrative model of behavioral prediction and the underlining concepts gender, norms and stigma. The findings suggest that youth engage in ITRs for much more than short-term material benefits, e.g. to belong in a group, improve long-term life chances and feel in control over their life situation.... (More)
The purpose of this thesis was to contribute to a more holistic understanding of how youth reason around Intergenerational Transactional Relationships (ITRs) by moving beyond the customarily analysis of youths’ motivations for the engagement. Empirical data was gained through qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with youth in Windhoek. Informants’ accounts were analyzed against an analytical framework inspired by the integrative model of behavioral prediction and the underlining concepts gender, norms and stigma. The findings suggest that youth engage in ITRs for much more than short-term material benefits, e.g. to belong in a group, improve long-term life chances and feel in control over their life situation. Youth appear to be well aware of risks related to ITRs. The analysis pointed to the importance of using the ITR concept with care since it is a socially constructed term that to youth encompasses many diverse relationships with varying traits. The wide meaning of the term furthermore causes difficulties in appreciating how accepted ITRs are, but youth suggested ITRs in general are shameful and taboo. Finally, whenever youths’ desirability to engage in ITRs is discussed, a distinction between how youth view ITRs in themselves and the life the relationships enable, is needed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Olofsgård, Lydia LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM71 20131
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Intergenerational transactional relationship, Youth, Sexuality, Gender, Gender norms, sub-Saharan Africa, Namibia, Windhoek, HIV, Integrative model of behavioral prediction
language
English
id
3798742
date added to LUP
2013-06-27 11:28:52
date last changed
2013-06-27 11:28:52
@misc{3798742,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this thesis was to contribute to a more holistic understanding of how youth reason around Intergenerational Transactional Relationships (ITRs) by moving beyond the customarily analysis of youths’ motivations for the engagement. Empirical data was gained through qualitative semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with youth in Windhoek. Informants’ accounts were analyzed against an analytical framework inspired by the integrative model of behavioral prediction and the underlining concepts gender, norms and stigma. The findings suggest that youth engage in ITRs for much more than short-term material benefits, e.g. to belong in a group, improve long-term life chances and feel in control over their life situation. Youth appear to be well aware of risks related to ITRs. The analysis pointed to the importance of using the ITR concept with care since it is a socially constructed term that to youth encompasses many diverse relationships with varying traits. The wide meaning of the term furthermore causes difficulties in appreciating how accepted ITRs are, but youth suggested ITRs in general are shameful and taboo. Finally, whenever youths’ desirability to engage in ITRs is discussed, a distinction between how youth view ITRs in themselves and the life the relationships enable, is needed.},
  author       = {Olofsgård, Lydia},
  keyword      = {Intergenerational transactional relationship,Youth,Sexuality,Gender,Gender norms,sub-Saharan Africa,Namibia,Windhoek,HIV,Integrative model of behavioral prediction},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {More than Cars, Cash and Cellphones - Exploring Youth Perceptions on Intergenerational Transactional Relationships},
  year         = {2013},
}