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Breaking down the barriers to Health Literacy in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights - A qualitative study of the experience of culture sensitive health communication among newly arrived refugees in Sweden

Svensson, Pia LU (2013) MPHN11 20131
Social Medicine and Global Health
Abstract
In Sweden, migrants suffer from poorer sexual and reproductive health than the general population due to exposures associated with pre- and post-migration process and difficulties that arise when meeting a new heath system. Health literacy is a term that is increasingly used for explaining people’s access to health preventive services, and where migrant populations has shown to possess lower levels compared to the overall population. Culture sensitive health communication is a method for reaching vulnerable groups at an early stage with information and for increasing health literacy. Since 2012, health information in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) has been provided by social orientation- and health communicators (SHK) to... (More)
In Sweden, migrants suffer from poorer sexual and reproductive health than the general population due to exposures associated with pre- and post-migration process and difficulties that arise when meeting a new heath system. Health literacy is a term that is increasingly used for explaining people’s access to health preventive services, and where migrant populations has shown to possess lower levels compared to the overall population. Culture sensitive health communication is a method for reaching vulnerable groups at an early stage with information and for increasing health literacy. Since 2012, health information in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) has been provided by social orientation- and health communicators (SHK) to newly arrived refugees in Skåne. Aim: The specific objective of this study was to explore how information in SRHR has been received among female participants. The overall aim was to investigate if the information had affected their levels of health literacy within the area. Methods: A qualitative research approach was used, with semi-structured interviews performed with nine women from three different language groups (Dari, Arabic, Somali), and analysed with content analysis. Findings: The main findings were covered in two themes; assumed homogeneity- failing to reach all, and planting a seed for future engagement. These represent how the perception of the information was deeply influenced by culture where the current form constrained the perceived access, but how it also contributed to increased knowledge, motivation and engagement in health. Conclusion: To provide information in SRHR in same-sex groups benefit those with lower pre-knowledge in SRHR topics and where cultural barriers are greater, whereas opportunities for discussions concerning cultural norms benefit from existing forms. Providing with tools for further information seeking is a strategy for empower the women to take control of their health, outside the scope of the SHK project. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Svensson, Pia LU
supervisor
organization
course
MPHN11 20131
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
3914815
date added to LUP
2013-08-09 13:20:26
date last changed
2014-09-04 08:34:29
@misc{3914815,
  abstract     = {In Sweden, migrants suffer from poorer sexual and reproductive health than the general population due to exposures associated with pre- and post-migration process and difficulties that arise when meeting a new heath system. Health literacy is a term that is increasingly used for explaining people’s access to health preventive services, and where migrant populations has shown to possess lower levels compared to the overall population. Culture sensitive health communication is a method for reaching vulnerable groups at an early stage with information and for increasing health literacy. Since 2012, health information in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) has been provided by social orientation- and health communicators (SHK) to newly arrived refugees in Skåne. Aim: The specific objective of this study was to explore how information in SRHR has been received among female participants. The overall aim was to investigate if the information had affected their levels of health literacy within the area. Methods: A qualitative research approach was used, with semi-structured interviews performed with nine women from three different language groups (Dari, Arabic, Somali), and analysed with content analysis. Findings: The main findings were covered in two themes; assumed homogeneity- failing to reach all, and planting a seed for future engagement. These represent how the perception of the information was deeply influenced by culture where the current form constrained the perceived access, but how it also contributed to increased knowledge, motivation and engagement in health. Conclusion: To provide information in SRHR in same-sex groups benefit those with lower pre-knowledge in SRHR topics and where cultural barriers are greater, whereas opportunities for discussions concerning cultural norms benefit from existing forms. Providing with tools for further information seeking is a strategy for empower the women to take control of their health, outside the scope of the SHK project.},
  author       = {Svensson, Pia},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Breaking down the barriers to Health Literacy in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights - A qualitative study of the experience of culture sensitive health communication among newly arrived refugees in Sweden},
  year         = {2013},
}