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Opposing Ugandan homosexual policies—an activist perspective

Nilsson, Elin LU (2013) SOPA63 20122
School of Social Work
Abstract
Based on the perspective of LGBTI-activists, the aim of this study was to analyze the policy processes that frame homosexuality in Uganda, as well as to illuminate different powerful stakeholders involved in the debate with power in the policy process. In October 2009, Member of Parliament David Bahati tabled the Anti-homosexuality Bill in Uganda. The drafting of the Bill condemns people convicted of homosexuality to life imprisonment and anyone convicted of aggravated homosexuality to suffer death. The Bill has caused protest among both local and international Human Right groups. This study is based on an eight-week Minor Field Study conducted in Uganda, which consisted of interviews with LGBTI-activists representing NGOs working toward... (More)
Based on the perspective of LGBTI-activists, the aim of this study was to analyze the policy processes that frame homosexuality in Uganda, as well as to illuminate different powerful stakeholders involved in the debate with power in the policy process. In October 2009, Member of Parliament David Bahati tabled the Anti-homosexuality Bill in Uganda. The drafting of the Bill condemns people convicted of homosexuality to life imprisonment and anyone convicted of aggravated homosexuality to suffer death. The Bill has caused protest among both local and international Human Right groups. This study is based on an eight-week Minor Field Study conducted in Uganda, which consisted of interviews with LGBTI-activists representing NGOs working toward improvement of homosexual rights. In my analysis I use different structural approaches in order to study the policy process. This helps to understand the complexity of the homosexuality debate and to locate sources of power and at the same time establish the division power among these sources. Marxist and Top Down perspectives show an unequal power deviation in which the government has much power and acts as a controller in the society. Elite theory brings forward elite stakeholders in the policy process; these include as religious leaders, politicians and the president. Turning to a Bottom Up perspective, the Pluralistic theory shows that the power division in the policy process is unequal and that the government is using authoritative means to maintain the power in society. Globalization theory shows that the Anti-homosexuality movement creates tensions between Uganda and its international relations. For instance, donor countries that contribute to its foreign aid have criticized Uganda. This study shows that the democratic system in Uganda is dysfunctional, implying that the LGBTI-activists face obstacles to their advocacy work for homosexual rights from the government and elite stakeholders. On the other hand, the LGBTI-organizations can gain power in the policy process, as depicted by the network theory, by networking with other stakeholders. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Nilsson, Elin LU
supervisor
organization
course
SOPA63 20122
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
LGBTI-activism, Anti-Homosexuality Bill, and Policy process, Democracy, Networking
language
English
id
4017792
date added to LUP
2013-09-06 10:45:00
date last changed
2013-09-06 10:45:00
@misc{4017792,
  abstract     = {Based on the perspective of LGBTI-activists, the aim of this study was to analyze the policy processes that frame homosexuality in Uganda, as well as to illuminate different powerful stakeholders involved in the debate with power in the policy process. In October 2009, Member of Parliament David Bahati tabled the Anti-homosexuality Bill in Uganda. The drafting of the Bill condemns people convicted of homosexuality to life imprisonment and anyone convicted of aggravated homosexuality to suffer death. The Bill has caused protest among both local and international Human Right groups. This study is based on an eight-week Minor Field Study conducted in Uganda, which consisted of interviews with LGBTI-activists representing NGOs working toward improvement of homosexual rights. In my analysis I use different structural approaches in order to study the policy process. This helps to understand the complexity of the homosexuality debate and to locate sources of power and at the same time establish the division power among these sources. Marxist and Top Down perspectives show an unequal power deviation in which the government has much power and acts as a controller in the society. Elite theory brings forward elite stakeholders in the policy process; these include as religious leaders, politicians and the president. Turning to a Bottom Up perspective, the Pluralistic theory shows that the power division in the policy process is unequal and that the government is using authoritative means to maintain the power in society. Globalization theory shows that the Anti-homosexuality movement creates tensions between Uganda and its international relations. For instance, donor countries that contribute to its foreign aid have criticized Uganda. This study shows that the democratic system in Uganda is dysfunctional, implying that the LGBTI-activists face obstacles to their advocacy work for homosexual rights from the government and elite stakeholders. On the other hand, the LGBTI-organizations can gain power in the policy process, as depicted by the network theory, by networking with other stakeholders.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Elin},
  keyword      = {LGBTI-activism,Anti-Homosexuality Bill,and Policy process,Democracy,Networking},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Opposing Ugandan homosexual policies—an activist perspective},
  year         = {2013},
}