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Buckling of a Load Bearing Timber-Glass Shear Wall - Development of a Finite Element Model

Neijbert, Greger LU (2013) In TVSM VSM820 20131
Structural Mechanics
Civil Engineering (M.Sc.Eng.)
Abstract
In a European collaborative research project a timber-glass shear wall element has been developed. This consists of a 10×1200×2400 mm thick glass pane of standard float glass with an LVL-frame adhesively bonded to the glass along its perimeter .In previous research several laboratory tests of these types of shear walls were performed. The tests, performed for various modes of loading, indicated that the shear walls collapsed due to buckling

The aim of this master thesis has been to further analyse the stability of the timber-glass shear wall element. The results from laboratory tests were evaluated and the shear wall element was analysed with the finite element method using a modelling and analysis computer software. The finite element... (More)
In a European collaborative research project a timber-glass shear wall element has been developed. This consists of a 10×1200×2400 mm thick glass pane of standard float glass with an LVL-frame adhesively bonded to the glass along its perimeter .In previous research several laboratory tests of these types of shear walls were performed. The tests, performed for various modes of loading, indicated that the shear walls collapsed due to buckling

The aim of this master thesis has been to further analyse the stability of the timber-glass shear wall element. The results from laboratory tests were evaluated and the shear wall element was analysed with the finite element method using a modelling and analysis computer software. The finite element model was calibrated to match the results from the experiments in terms of failure loads, assuming failure was due to instability in the shear wall element. Further analyses were made on the influence of various parameters (e.g. material and geometry) on the structural behaviour. Of special interest has also been to investigate the load bearing capacity when combining vertical and horizontal loads.

The results show that the buckling load was decreased when using a less stiff adhesive. The elastic stiffness of the timber studs had a larger relative impact on the stability of the shear wall element, than the elastic modulus of glass. The buckling shape also turned out to be dependent on the ratio between the stiffness of glass and the stiffness of the vertical timber studs. In a combined load case two interaction formulas were fitted to the results of the analysis.

The buckling analyses was in the end, after a lot of work, a good tool to use when estimating the critical load limit of the timber glass shear wall. However, the boundary conditions have showed to be of great importance in order to get an accurate result. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Neijbert, Greger LU
supervisor
organization
course
VSM820 20131
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
publication/series
TVSM
report number
TVSM-5189
ISSN
0281-6679
language
English
id
4144485
date added to LUP
2013-11-15 11:07:03
date last changed
2013-11-15 11:07:03
@misc{4144485,
  abstract     = {In a European collaborative research project a timber-glass shear wall element has been developed. This consists of a 10×1200×2400 mm thick glass pane of standard float glass with an LVL-frame adhesively bonded to the glass along its perimeter .In previous research several laboratory tests of these types of shear walls were performed. The tests, performed for various modes of loading, indicated that the shear walls collapsed due to buckling

The aim of this master thesis has been to further analyse the stability of the timber-glass shear wall element. The results from laboratory tests were evaluated and the shear wall element was analysed with the finite element method using a modelling and analysis computer software. The finite element model was calibrated to match the results from the experiments in terms of failure loads, assuming failure was due to instability in the shear wall element. Further analyses were made on the influence of various parameters (e.g. material and geometry) on the structural behaviour. Of special interest has also been to investigate the load bearing capacity when combining vertical and horizontal loads.

The results show that the buckling load was decreased when using a less stiff adhesive. The elastic stiffness of the timber studs had a larger relative impact on the stability of the shear wall element, than the elastic modulus of glass. The buckling shape also turned out to be dependent on the ratio between the stiffness of glass and the stiffness of the vertical timber studs. In a combined load case two interaction formulas were fitted to the results of the analysis.

The buckling analyses was in the end, after a lot of work, a good tool to use when estimating the critical load limit of the timber glass shear wall. However, the boundary conditions have showed to be of great importance in order to get an accurate result.},
  author       = {Neijbert, Greger},
  issn         = {0281-6679},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {TVSM},
  title        = {Buckling of a Load Bearing Timber-Glass Shear Wall - Development of a Finite Element Model},
  year         = {2013},
}