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Phenotypic variability in Scrippsiella aff. hangoei (Dinophyceae) in response to salinity

Khandan, Saghar (2013) BION35 20121
Degree Projects in Biology
Abstract
Abstract

The salinity tolerance and growth rate was investigated for the cold-water dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei. The dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei was isolated, cultured and studied in 20 strains from four different Antarctic lakes with different salinity levels and exposed to varying salinities from 0 to 70 Psu. My objective was to determine if salinity tolerance differ among different lake population and are the populations adapted to the salinity of their lakes of origin. My results indicated that Scrippsiella aff. hangoei can survive at salinities from 0 to 35 but grow better in the salinity of 4,8 and 18, while not all strains could tolerate the high salinities of 50 and 70. Moreover, the growth rate was... (More)
Abstract

The salinity tolerance and growth rate was investigated for the cold-water dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei. The dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei was isolated, cultured and studied in 20 strains from four different Antarctic lakes with different salinity levels and exposed to varying salinities from 0 to 70 Psu. My objective was to determine if salinity tolerance differ among different lake population and are the populations adapted to the salinity of their lakes of origin. My results indicated that Scrippsiella aff. hangoei can survive at salinities from 0 to 35 but grow better in the salinity of 4,8 and 18, while not all strains could tolerate the high salinities of 50 and 70. Moreover, the growth rate was different in each salinity; and the maximal growth rates occurred at intermediate salinities of 8 for the strain from Vereteno Lake and 18 for lakes Highway, McNeil and Abraxas. To conclude, all strains have a wide phenotypic plasticity and there is no evidence of local adaptation. However, the fact that all strains in my experiment seem to tolerate low salinity better than high salinity indicates some adaptation away from that of the sea environment (salinity of 35 Psu) from which the species originate. (Less)
Abstract
Popular science summary

Salinity has been identified as an important factor in governing both growth and distribution of phytoplankton in marine and brackish ecosystems. In my thesis work I investigated the salinity tolerance and growth rate of the cold-water dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei from an Antarctic population. The work was carried out at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

For my experiments, I used 20 strains of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei, which had previously been isolated from four different lakes in the Vestfold Hills area (68°S, 78°E), during the Antarctic summer of 2009, Figure 1. These lakes include Lake Abraxas, Highway Lake, Lake Vereteno, and Lake McNeil. The main difference... (More)
Popular science summary

Salinity has been identified as an important factor in governing both growth and distribution of phytoplankton in marine and brackish ecosystems. In my thesis work I investigated the salinity tolerance and growth rate of the cold-water dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei from an Antarctic population. The work was carried out at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

For my experiments, I used 20 strains of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei, which had previously been isolated from four different lakes in the Vestfold Hills area (68°S, 78°E), during the Antarctic summer of 2009, Figure 1. These lakes include Lake Abraxas, Highway Lake, Lake Vereteno, and Lake McNeil. The main difference among the lakes was their salinity regime, ranging from 2 to 17 Psu. These strains were were grown at varying salinities from 0 to 70 Psu.

My objective was to determine if salinity tolerance differed among different lake populations with the hypothesis that the strains would be adapted to the salinity of their lakes of origin.

My results indicated that Scrippsiella aff. hangoei can survive at salinities from 0 to 35 but grow better in the salinities ranging from 4 to 18. but not all strains could tolerate the high salinities of 50 and 70. Moreover, the growth rate was different in each salinity; and the maximal growth rates occurred at intermediate salinities of 8 for the strain from Vereteno Lake and 18 for lakes Highway, McNeil and Abraxas. To conclude, all strains have a wide phenotypic plasticity and there is no evidence of local adaptation. However, the fact that all strains in my experiment seem to tolerate low salinity better than high salinity indicates some adaptation away from that of the sea environment (salinity of 35 Psu) from which the species originate.

Supervisor: Karin Rengefors
Master´s Degree Project 45 credits in Aquatic Ecology 2013
Department of Biology, Lund University (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Khandan, Saghar
supervisor
organization
course
BION35 20121
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
4406778
date added to LUP
2014-04-24 17:30:22
date last changed
2014-04-24 17:30:22
@misc{4406778,
  abstract     = {Popular science summary

Salinity has been identified as an important factor in governing both growth and distribution of phytoplankton in marine and brackish ecosystems. In my thesis work I investigated the salinity tolerance and growth rate of the cold-water dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei from an Antarctic population. The work was carried out at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

For my experiments, I used 20 strains of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella aff. hangoei, which had previously been isolated from four different lakes in the Vestfold Hills area (68°S, 78°E), during the Antarctic summer of 2009, Figure 1. These lakes include Lake Abraxas, Highway Lake, Lake Vereteno, and Lake McNeil. The main difference among the lakes was their salinity regime, ranging from 2 to 17 Psu. These strains were were grown at varying salinities from 0 to 70 Psu.

My objective was to determine if salinity tolerance differed among different lake populations with the hypothesis that the strains would be adapted to the salinity of their lakes of origin.

My results indicated that Scrippsiella aff. hangoei can survive at salinities from 0 to 35 but grow better in the salinities ranging from 4 to 18. but not all strains could tolerate the high salinities of 50 and 70. Moreover, the growth rate was different in each salinity; and the maximal growth rates occurred at intermediate salinities of 8 for the strain from Vereteno Lake and 18 for lakes Highway, McNeil and Abraxas. To conclude, all strains have a wide phenotypic plasticity and there is no evidence of local adaptation. However, the fact that all strains in my experiment seem to tolerate low salinity better than high salinity indicates some adaptation away from that of the sea environment (salinity of 35 Psu) from which the species originate.

Supervisor: Karin Rengefors
Master´s Degree Project 45 credits in Aquatic Ecology 2013
Department of Biology, Lund University},
  author       = {Khandan, Saghar},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Phenotypic variability in Scrippsiella aff. hangoei (Dinophyceae) in response to salinity},
  year         = {2013},
}