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Governing through freedom and control: A Foucauldian reading of citizenship and rights in EU

Savva, Kypros LU (2014) STVM23 20141
Department of Political Science
Abstract
More than ever before the European integration project reached a point of political and economic crisis that cannot be dismissed. The main academic and political solutions presented for the crisis is to refocus on European citizens, enhance their rights and make them part of the system, a move considered to be a response to democratic deficit. The present thesis takes the discussion one step further, by refusing to take Union citizenship as a status for granted. Instead, with the help of a critical Foucauldian perspective, it moves beyond the classical political and legal conceptualisations of citizenship, and tries to explain what and how Union citizenship was developed, for what reasons and with which implications. The main claim made... (More)
More than ever before the European integration project reached a point of political and economic crisis that cannot be dismissed. The main academic and political solutions presented for the crisis is to refocus on European citizens, enhance their rights and make them part of the system, a move considered to be a response to democratic deficit. The present thesis takes the discussion one step further, by refusing to take Union citizenship as a status for granted. Instead, with the help of a critical Foucauldian perspective, it moves beyond the classical political and legal conceptualisations of citizenship, and tries to explain what and how Union citizenship was developed, for what reasons and with which implications. The main claim made here is that Union citizenship was gradually established as part of the advanced liberal governmental rationality of the EU, as a mechanism for incorporating European population in their government. This creates an ‘ideal’ normalised category of citizens, and also provides a space for expressing dissent towards the system. And in any case, the present crisis should be read as part of an ongoing process, not an end product. (Less)
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author
Savva, Kypros LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVM23 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
citizenship, European Union, Foucault, governmentality, liberalism
language
English
id
4448262
date added to LUP
2014-07-07 14:44:51
date last changed
2014-07-07 14:44:51
@misc{4448262,
  abstract     = {More than ever before the European integration project reached a point of political and economic crisis that cannot be dismissed. The main academic and political solutions presented for the crisis is to refocus on European citizens, enhance their rights and make them part of the system, a move considered to be a response to democratic deficit. The present thesis takes the discussion one step further, by refusing to take Union citizenship as a status for granted. Instead, with the help of a critical Foucauldian perspective, it moves beyond the classical political and legal conceptualisations of citizenship, and tries to explain what and how Union citizenship was developed, for what reasons and with which implications. The main claim made here is that Union citizenship was gradually established as part of the advanced liberal governmental rationality of the EU, as a mechanism for incorporating European population in their government. This creates an ‘ideal’ normalised category of citizens, and also provides a space for expressing dissent towards the system. And in any case, the present crisis should be read as part of an ongoing process, not an end product.},
  author       = {Savva, Kypros},
  keyword      = {citizenship,European Union,Foucault,governmentality,liberalism},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Governing through freedom and control: A Foucauldian reading of citizenship and rights in EU},
  year         = {2014},
}