Advanced

To dam or not to dam : a case study of conflict surrounding the Collinsville Dams and implications for the future

Hart, Laura LU (2014) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM01 20141
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Hydroelectric power is a controversial renewable energy. Adding more renewables to the energy mix is becoming more critical with the onslaught of climate change, while river health and water quality remain a highly pertinent environmental issue. Balancing the need for local renewable energy and environmental concerns is the topic of many cases. This thesis analyzes a case of conflict surrounding the debate of the Collinsville Dams on the Farmington River, which exemplify hurtles in developing a run-of-river hydropower project. Many factors are involved in the process, and the need to look at hydropower projects on existing dam sites is of concern in New England as many dams are up for relicensing. Stakeholders for the Collinsville Dams are... (More)
Hydroelectric power is a controversial renewable energy. Adding more renewables to the energy mix is becoming more critical with the onslaught of climate change, while river health and water quality remain a highly pertinent environmental issue. Balancing the need for local renewable energy and environmental concerns is the topic of many cases. This thesis analyzes a case of conflict surrounding the debate of the Collinsville Dams on the Farmington River, which exemplify hurtles in developing a run-of-river hydropower project. Many factors are involved in the process, and the need to look at hydropower projects on existing dam sites is of concern in New England as many dams are up for relicensing. Stakeholders for the Collinsville Dams are interviewed and the perceptions and findings regarding the complexity and hurtles to the project are displayed. If a sustainability science method was utilized for diverse stakeholders to come to an agreement to benefit both the river and the need for renewable energy, future reconciliation of energy, environment, and society may be better addressed. Sustainability science could prove a solution for optimizing the renewable energy benefit of run-of-river hydropower alongside of protecting a watershed and minimizing the impacts. The power relations and lack of transparency among the town, the State Renewable Energy goals, as well as various stakeholders in this case of conflict will be looked into for a greater understanding on the Collinsville Dams. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Hart, Laura LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM01 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Farmington River, Collinsville Dams, run-of-river hydropower, local renewable energy, sustainability science
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2014:002
language
English
id
4449132
date added to LUP
2014-05-27 16:23:04
date last changed
2014-05-27 16:23:04
@misc{4449132,
  abstract     = {Hydroelectric power is a controversial renewable energy. Adding more renewables to the energy mix is becoming more critical with the onslaught of climate change, while river health and water quality remain a highly pertinent environmental issue. Balancing the need for local renewable energy and environmental concerns is the topic of many cases. This thesis analyzes a case of conflict surrounding the debate of the Collinsville Dams on the Farmington River, which exemplify hurtles in developing a run-of-river hydropower project. Many factors are involved in the process, and the need to look at hydropower projects on existing dam sites is of concern in New England as many dams are up for relicensing. Stakeholders for the Collinsville Dams are interviewed and the perceptions and findings regarding the complexity and hurtles to the project are displayed. If a sustainability science method was utilized for diverse stakeholders to come to an agreement to benefit both the river and the need for renewable energy, future reconciliation of energy, environment, and society may be better addressed. Sustainability science could prove a solution for optimizing the renewable energy benefit of run-of-river hydropower alongside of protecting a watershed and minimizing the impacts. The power relations and lack of transparency among the town, the State Renewable Energy goals, as well as various stakeholders in this case of conflict will be looked into for a greater understanding on the Collinsville Dams.},
  author       = {Hart, Laura},
  keyword      = {Farmington River,Collinsville Dams,run-of-river hydropower,local renewable energy,sustainability science},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {To dam or not to dam : a case study of conflict surrounding the Collinsville Dams and implications for the future},
  year         = {2014},
}