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The Politicization of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights: In the Post-Millennium Development Goals negotiations

Pereira, Adriana LU (2014) STVK12 20141
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) emerged from a fragmentation of different meaning of SRHR coming together to form one complex policy area. SRHR has been politicized in the past by predominant activist groups such as human rights and feminists (including those working with both fields simultaneously). Politicization refers to the process by which an issue becomes prominent in a given political space. Despite its loose term, politicization can occur at different levels, international, national and local. At the international level, the post-Millennium Development Goals is an ongoing hotspot for a myriad of negotiations. SRHR is an excellent example of a politicized concept, whereby two coalitions can be discerned; an... (More)
Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) emerged from a fragmentation of different meaning of SRHR coming together to form one complex policy area. SRHR has been politicized in the past by predominant activist groups such as human rights and feminists (including those working with both fields simultaneously). Politicization refers to the process by which an issue becomes prominent in a given political space. Despite its loose term, politicization can occur at different levels, international, national and local. At the international level, the post-Millennium Development Goals is an ongoing hotspot for a myriad of negotiations. SRHR is an excellent example of a politicized concept, whereby two coalitions can be discerned; an advocate coalition for the inclusion of SRHR in the post-MDG agenda and a counter coalition. This thesis explores how SRHR is politicized within the post-MDG negotiations by using frame theory. Frame theory illustrates how a human rights frame is preferred by the advocate coalition, while the counter coalition uses the natural family frame. Within the advocate and counter coalition considerable differences are identified. The paper concludes that SRHRs, as they are currently framed by both coalitions, could lead to an over emphasis on women and girls which could be problematic in the long-term perspective and have a negative effect on other goals. However, the next set of goals should not commit the same mistake as the MDGs and SRHRs need to be included from its very inception. (Less)
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author
Pereira, Adriana LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20141
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, Human Rights, Post-MDGs, Women’s health, advocacy networks
language
English
id
4451175
date added to LUP
2014-09-17 13:28:28
date last changed
2014-09-17 13:28:28
@misc{4451175,
  abstract     = {Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) emerged from a fragmentation of different meaning of SRHR coming together to form one complex policy area. SRHR has been politicized in the past by predominant activist groups such as human rights and feminists (including those working with both fields simultaneously). Politicization refers to the process by which an issue becomes prominent in a given political space. Despite its loose term, politicization can occur at different levels, international, national and local. At the international level, the post-Millennium Development Goals is an ongoing hotspot for a myriad of negotiations. SRHR is an excellent example of a politicized concept, whereby two coalitions can be discerned; an advocate coalition for the inclusion of SRHR in the post-MDG agenda and a counter coalition. This thesis explores how SRHR is politicized within the post-MDG negotiations by using frame theory. Frame theory illustrates how a human rights frame is preferred by the advocate coalition, while the counter coalition uses the natural family frame. Within the advocate and counter coalition considerable differences are identified. The paper concludes that SRHRs, as they are currently framed by both coalitions, could lead to an over emphasis on women and girls which could be problematic in the long-term perspective and have a negative effect on other goals. However, the next set of goals should not commit the same mistake as the MDGs and SRHRs need to be included from its very inception.},
  author       = {Pereira, Adriana},
  keyword      = {Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights,Human Rights,Post-MDGs,Women’s health,advocacy networks},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Politicization of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights: In the Post-Millennium Development Goals negotiations},
  year         = {2014},
}