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Nonviolence and the Arab Spring?

Andersson, Johan LU (2014) FKVK02 20141
Department of Political Science
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate how nonviolent methods can be successfully used in struggles against repressive regimes. This is done by examining two cases of uprisings in the Arab Spring, Egypt and Tunisia. Drawing from theories on nonviolence, mainly Gene Sharp; five elements that are considered favourable for nonviolent struggles has been selected for the analysis. The methodology employed to examine these elements is an intensive approach with a comparative aim. The result of this study, shows that even though not following all elements advised by theory, the uprisings still managed to succeed in their efforts. The results indicates that the key to success in both cases was the fast mobilization rate of participants,... (More)
The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate how nonviolent methods can be successfully used in struggles against repressive regimes. This is done by examining two cases of uprisings in the Arab Spring, Egypt and Tunisia. Drawing from theories on nonviolence, mainly Gene Sharp; five elements that are considered favourable for nonviolent struggles has been selected for the analysis. The methodology employed to examine these elements is an intensive approach with a comparative aim. The result of this study, shows that even though not following all elements advised by theory, the uprisings still managed to succeed in their efforts. The results indicates that the key to success in both cases was the fast mobilization rate of participants, their united cause and the shifting allegiances of pro-regime supporters. Finally, the study points out that more comparative research that includes more elements is needed on the use of nonviolent methods. (Less)
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author
Andersson, Johan LU
supervisor
organization
course
FKVK02 20141
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
nonviolence, civil resistance, mobilization, Arab Spring, Tunisia, Egypt, Gene Sharp
language
English
id
4451306
date added to LUP
2014-07-07 14:37:35
date last changed
2014-07-07 14:37:35
@misc{4451306,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate how nonviolent methods can be successfully used in struggles against repressive regimes. This is done by examining two cases of uprisings in the Arab Spring, Egypt and Tunisia. Drawing from theories on nonviolence, mainly Gene Sharp; five elements that are considered favourable for nonviolent struggles has been selected for the analysis. The methodology employed to examine these elements is an intensive approach with a comparative aim. The result of this study, shows that even though not following all elements advised by theory, the uprisings still managed to succeed in their efforts. The results indicates that the key to success in both cases was the fast mobilization rate of participants, their united cause and the shifting allegiances of pro-regime supporters. Finally, the study points out that more comparative research that includes more elements is needed on the use of nonviolent methods.},
  author       = {Andersson, Johan},
  keyword      = {nonviolence,civil resistance,mobilization,Arab Spring,Tunisia,Egypt,Gene Sharp},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Nonviolence and the Arab Spring?},
  year         = {2014},
}