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Mainstream Discourse: Contrasting Perspectives on CCT Programs and Gender Equality

Broman, Erik LU (2014) STVK12 20141
Department of Political Science
Abstract (Swedish)
With the deadline of the 2015 Millenium Development Goals approaching fast, developmental institutions are eager to identify which programs have made an impact and worth continuing as well as which have failed. There have been a number of programs conducted and evaluated in the last decade and now is the time to investigate where they can be improved and restructured. Conditional cash transfers (CCT) have been a large stride towards achieving the MDGs in the short term through poverty alleviation and long term in health and education, yet have many criticisms. One of these criticisms, gender inequalities, is what this thesis will focus on. Questions on long term effects on social structure and power hierarchy, especially gender equality... (More)
With the deadline of the 2015 Millenium Development Goals approaching fast, developmental institutions are eager to identify which programs have made an impact and worth continuing as well as which have failed. There have been a number of programs conducted and evaluated in the last decade and now is the time to investigate where they can be improved and restructured. Conditional cash transfers (CCT) have been a large stride towards achieving the MDGs in the short term through poverty alleviation and long term in health and education, yet have many criticisms. One of these criticisms, gender inequalities, is what this thesis will focus on. Questions on long term effects on social structure and power hierarchy, especially gender equality have been heavily debated. These arguments have given me the motivation for my thesis. This study identifies the knowledge produced by the World Bank and Overseas Development Institute and makes a comparative analysis under a gender lens in hopes to provide insight for further research in promoting gender equality. I hope to uncover how basic ideology of these institutions can alter knowledge they produce. The concept of governmentality is self-evident in cash transfer programs, and also what I find makes them so interesting. From program framework, targeting, monitoring and evaluations the governmentality lens may finally help put in focus the structural changes taking place and provide insight on the effects on gender inequalities and how to mainstream them in both active and future programs. Discourse will provide me the tool to unweave the tapestry of language. (Less)
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author
Broman, Erik LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20141
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Conditional cash transfer, governmentality, gender equality, World Bank, Overseas Development Institute, knowledge
language
English
id
4451373
date added to LUP
2014-06-18 12:16:16
date last changed
2014-06-18 12:16:16
@misc{4451373,
  abstract     = {With the deadline of the 2015 Millenium Development Goals approaching fast, developmental institutions are eager to identify which programs have made an impact and worth continuing as well as which have failed. There have been a number of programs conducted and evaluated in the last decade and now is the time to investigate where they can be improved and restructured. Conditional cash transfers (CCT) have been a large stride towards achieving the MDGs in the short term through poverty alleviation and long term in health and education, yet have many criticisms. One of these criticisms, gender inequalities, is what this thesis will focus on. Questions on long term effects on social structure and power hierarchy, especially gender equality have been heavily debated. These arguments have given me the motivation for my thesis. This study identifies the knowledge produced by the World Bank and Overseas Development Institute and makes a comparative analysis under a gender lens in hopes to provide insight for further research in promoting gender equality. I hope to uncover how basic ideology of these institutions can alter knowledge they produce. The concept of governmentality is self-evident in cash transfer programs, and also what I find makes them so interesting. From program framework, targeting, monitoring and evaluations the governmentality lens may finally help put in focus the structural changes taking place and provide insight on the effects on gender inequalities and how to mainstream them in both active and future programs. Discourse will provide me the tool to unweave the tapestry of language.},
  author       = {Broman, Erik},
  keyword      = {Conditional cash transfer,governmentality,gender equality,World Bank,Overseas Development Institute,knowledge},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Mainstream Discourse: Contrasting Perspectives on CCT Programs and Gender Equality},
  year         = {2014},
}