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A Reunification of Close Ties - Identity in the Russian Claim to Crimea

Veijalainen, Seija LU (2014) FKVK02 20141
Department of Political Science
Abstract
This study examines how identity is expressed in the Russian government rhetoric through a narrative analysis, focusing on statements given during March 2014, by President Vladimir Putin and Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov. The central themes of interest are region, religion, race/ethnicity and language, which are discussed in relation to the societal themes patriotism, security, siege and delegitimization. The main findings are that race/ethnicity is the most prevalent theme, used in the implementation of beliefs about security, while also delegitimization is a common element associated with security of ethnic groups. Religion is not a frequently used theme and region is often overlapping with ethnicity while also being related... (More)
This study examines how identity is expressed in the Russian government rhetoric through a narrative analysis, focusing on statements given during March 2014, by President Vladimir Putin and Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov. The central themes of interest are region, religion, race/ethnicity and language, which are discussed in relation to the societal themes patriotism, security, siege and delegitimization. The main findings are that race/ethnicity is the most prevalent theme, used in the implementation of beliefs about security, while also delegitimization is a common element associated with security of ethnic groups. Religion is not a frequently used theme and region is often overlapping with ethnicity while also being related to a security context. Further findings are that human rights, often connected to ethnic groups, are emphasized in relation to security and that the central purpose appears to be to defend the Russian military actions. Inconsistencies regarding the geopolitical claim to Crimea are found in the information given in the press conference and speech by President Vladimir Putin. (Less)
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author
Veijalainen, Seija LU
supervisor
organization
course
FKVK02 20141
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Identity, societal beliefs, geopolitical claims, Russia, Crimea
language
English
id
4451374
date added to LUP
2014-07-07 14:36:31
date last changed
2014-07-07 14:36:31
@misc{4451374,
  abstract     = {This study examines how identity is expressed in the Russian government rhetoric through a narrative analysis, focusing on statements given during March 2014, by President Vladimir Putin and Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergey Lavrov. The central themes of interest are region, religion, race/ethnicity and language, which are discussed in relation to the societal themes patriotism, security, siege and delegitimization. The main findings are that race/ethnicity is the most prevalent theme, used in the implementation of beliefs about security, while also delegitimization is a common element associated with security of ethnic groups. Religion is not a frequently used theme and region is often overlapping with ethnicity while also being related to a security context. Further findings are that human rights, often connected to ethnic groups, are emphasized in relation to security and that the central purpose appears to be to defend the Russian military actions. Inconsistencies regarding the geopolitical claim to Crimea are found in the information given in the press conference and speech by President Vladimir Putin.},
  author       = {Veijalainen, Seija},
  keyword      = {Identity,societal beliefs,geopolitical claims,Russia,Crimea},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {A Reunification of Close Ties - Identity in the Russian Claim to Crimea},
  year         = {2014},
}