Advanced

Running on fossil fumes : the Norwegian Snøvit case of fossil fuel depletion and obstacles for a sustainable transition to renewables

Melnic, Vlad LU (2014) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM01 20141
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Global dependence on fossil fuels encourages the depletion of non-renewable resources, produces greenhouse gas emissions, and ultimately contributes to anthropogenic climate change. Current efforts do not reduce depletion rates of these non-renewable resources despite collective action to improve long-term sustainability of Norwegian energy governance in the Barents Sea. This study focuses on the Snøvit (Snow White) development as a case of oil and gas resource extraction on the Norwegian continental shelf, and how the actors involved interact to ensure the long-term sustainability of national energy governance. Data is collected according to the indicators outlined in Elinor Ostrom’s framework for analyzing social-ecological systems... (More)
Global dependence on fossil fuels encourages the depletion of non-renewable resources, produces greenhouse gas emissions, and ultimately contributes to anthropogenic climate change. Current efforts do not reduce depletion rates of these non-renewable resources despite collective action to improve long-term sustainability of Norwegian energy governance in the Barents Sea. This study focuses on the Snøvit (Snow White) development as a case of oil and gas resource extraction on the Norwegian continental shelf, and how the actors involved interact to ensure the long-term sustainability of national energy governance. Data is collected according to the indicators outlined in Elinor Ostrom’s framework for analyzing social-ecological systems (SESs), using industry and governmental reports, publications, and academic articles. Information on these indicators is analyzed to assess their contribution to self-organization for sustainability, and summarized in tables. Results show that sixteen indicators restrict self-organization efforts for sustainability. This effect is likely due to several factors such as a high exploitation rate in contrast to a negligible regeneration rate, high economic value, as well as other macroeconomic factors. These findings are congruent with Ostrom’s theory that collective action and self-organization between actors can ensure conservation of a common resource when all indicators show a positive effect. The study demonstrates that exploitation of Snøvit resources leads to their depletion due to sixteen indicators that have a negative impact on self-organization for long-term sustainability. As a result of this work, policy makers and industry actors should guide decisions and collaborative efforts to improve environmental performance and address critical aspects to ensure long-term sustainability of energy resource governance according to the sixteen identified indicators. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Melnic, Vlad LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM01 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
energy governance, fossil fuel resource depletion, long-term sustainability, resource governance, socio-ecological system, sustainability science
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2014:003
language
English
id
4451851
date added to LUP
2014-06-02 09:16:08
date last changed
2014-06-02 09:16:08
@misc{4451851,
  abstract     = {Global dependence on fossil fuels encourages the depletion of non-renewable resources, produces greenhouse gas emissions, and ultimately contributes to anthropogenic climate change. Current efforts do not reduce depletion rates of these non-renewable resources despite collective action to improve long-term sustainability of Norwegian energy governance in the Barents Sea. This study focuses on the Snøvit (Snow White) development as a case of oil and gas resource extraction on the Norwegian continental shelf, and how the actors involved interact to ensure the long-term sustainability of national energy governance. Data is collected according to the indicators outlined in Elinor Ostrom’s framework for analyzing social-ecological systems (SESs), using industry and governmental reports, publications, and academic articles. Information on these indicators is analyzed to assess their contribution to self-organization for sustainability, and summarized in tables. Results show that sixteen indicators restrict self-organization efforts for sustainability. This effect is likely due to several factors such as a high exploitation rate in contrast to a negligible regeneration rate, high economic value, as well as other macroeconomic factors. These findings are congruent with Ostrom’s theory that collective action and self-organization between actors can ensure conservation of a common resource when all indicators show a positive effect. The study demonstrates that exploitation of Snøvit resources leads to their depletion due to sixteen indicators that have a negative impact on self-organization for long-term sustainability. As a result of this work, policy makers and industry actors should guide decisions and collaborative efforts to improve environmental performance and address critical aspects to ensure long-term sustainability of energy resource governance according to the sixteen identified indicators.},
  author       = {Melnic, Vlad},
  keyword      = {energy governance,fossil fuel resource depletion,long-term sustainability,resource governance,socio-ecological system,sustainability science},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Running on fossil fumes : the Norwegian Snøvit case of fossil fuel depletion and obstacles for a sustainable transition to renewables},
  year         = {2014},
}