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Giving the green light : analysis of transition management within the Dutch energy transition

Verheugt, Marten Frederik LU (2014) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM01 20141
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Investing in renewable energy sources (RES) is one pivotal way to ensure future energy sustainability that also mitigates climate change. The EU has committed to increase the share of renewable energy (RE), and has tasked member states with targets. The Netherlands has now issued the ‘Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth’ to attain a share of 14% RE by 2020. Coincidentally the theoretical knowledge of transition management (TM) has been part of Dutch policy making since 2001. This thesis sets about analysing how TM has been incorporated in this policy to appraise its probable efficacy in meeting the objective. First the transition typology is assessed. Then, through using the analytical framework of TM as lens, the Energy Agreement is... (More)
Investing in renewable energy sources (RES) is one pivotal way to ensure future energy sustainability that also mitigates climate change. The EU has committed to increase the share of renewable energy (RE), and has tasked member states with targets. The Netherlands has now issued the ‘Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth’ to attain a share of 14% RE by 2020. Coincidentally the theoretical knowledge of transition management (TM) has been part of Dutch policy making since 2001. This thesis sets about analysing how TM has been incorporated in this policy to appraise its probable efficacy in meeting the objective. First the transition typology is assessed. Then, through using the analytical framework of TM as lens, the Energy Agreement is scrutinised. The policy’s strategic, tactical, and operational levels are discerned, as well as their respective objectives, actions and instruments. Co-evolution is furthermore examined. The study finds the energy transition to follow a targeted typology with much governmental interference and an integral approach. Overall, the Energy Agreement follows the theoretical ideas of TM to a large extent, where there is a multi-level and multi-actor approach. Nevertheless, there are some parts within the Energy Agreement that are worrisome and can prove detrimental to its own success. For example, co-evolution is hampered because the strategic level is locked due to supranational influence. The analysis also demonstrates a dominance of incumbent regime actors, as well as a strong focus on cost-effectiveness that hampers innovation and niche chances which are much needed for a longer-term energy transition. The findings also point towards drawbacks of TM in itself where too much faith is fostered in the dominant regime and government. As a result, enhanced niche participation and inclusion is warranted to ensure the regime is fundamentally challenged. Furthermore, parameters are needed for directed incrementalism to allow more time for niches to ripen. Finally, this study illustrates the need to add an external, supranational level to be incorporated in the analytical framework of TM to facilitate co-evolution. (Less)
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author
Verheugt, Marten Frederik LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM01 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
sustainability science, renewable energy, transition theory, co-evolution, feed-in tariff, policy evaluation
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2014:005
language
English
id
4452172
date added to LUP
2014-06-02 09:15:15
date last changed
2014-06-02 09:15:15
@misc{4452172,
  abstract     = {Investing in renewable energy sources (RES) is one pivotal way to ensure future energy sustainability that also mitigates climate change. The EU has committed to increase the share of renewable energy (RE), and has tasked member states with targets. The Netherlands has now issued the ‘Energy Agreement for Sustainable Growth’ to attain a share of 14% RE by 2020. Coincidentally the theoretical knowledge of transition management (TM) has been part of Dutch policy making since 2001. This thesis sets about analysing how TM has been incorporated in this policy to appraise its probable efficacy in meeting the objective. First the transition typology is assessed. Then, through using the analytical framework of TM as lens, the Energy Agreement is scrutinised. The policy’s strategic, tactical, and operational levels are discerned, as well as their respective objectives, actions and instruments. Co-evolution is furthermore examined. The study finds the energy transition to follow a targeted typology with much governmental interference and an integral approach. Overall, the Energy Agreement follows the theoretical ideas of TM to a large extent, where there is a multi-level and multi-actor approach. Nevertheless, there are some parts within the Energy Agreement that are worrisome and can prove detrimental to its own success. For example, co-evolution is hampered because the strategic level is locked due to supranational influence. The analysis also demonstrates a dominance of incumbent regime actors, as well as a strong focus on cost-effectiveness that hampers innovation and niche chances which are much needed for a longer-term energy transition. The findings also point towards drawbacks of TM in itself where too much faith is fostered in the dominant regime and government. As a result, enhanced niche participation and inclusion is warranted to ensure the regime is fundamentally challenged. Furthermore, parameters are needed for directed incrementalism to allow more time for niches to ripen. Finally, this study illustrates the need to add an external, supranational level to be incorporated in the analytical framework of TM to facilitate co-evolution.},
  author       = {Verheugt, Marten Frederik},
  keyword      = {sustainability science,renewable energy,transition theory,co-evolution,feed-in tariff,policy evaluation},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Giving the green light : analysis of transition management within the Dutch energy transition},
  year         = {2014},
}