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Diet quality and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort

Mandalazi, Emmanuel LU (2014) MPHN11 20141
Social Medicine and Global Health
Abstract
Background: The rapid increase in type 2 diabetes worldwide has mainly been attributed to lifestyle factors, including poor eating habits and physical inactivity. Type and quality of diet is a key factor in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Aim: To investigate the association between diet quality and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Methods and Subjects: This prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort included 26,172 subjects (62% women) aged 44 to 74 years at baseline (1991-1996), with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. By 31 December 2009, 2,829 subjects were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dietary intakes were estimated using a modified diet history method. A diet quality index was constructed... (More)
Background: The rapid increase in type 2 diabetes worldwide has mainly been attributed to lifestyle factors, including poor eating habits and physical inactivity. Type and quality of diet is a key factor in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Aim: To investigate the association between diet quality and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Methods and Subjects: This prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort included 26,172 subjects (62% women) aged 44 to 74 years at baseline (1991-1996), with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. By 31 December 2009, 2,829 subjects were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dietary intakes were estimated using a modified diet history method. A diet quality index was constructed based on adherence to recommended intakes of saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. Subjects were categorized into three groups. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the association between diet quality and risk of incident type 2 diabetes.

Results: Hazard ratios for incident type 2 diabetes in the highest versus lowest category of diet quality index among men were 1.05 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.25; P for trend = 0.94) and women, 1.03 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.22; P for trend = 0.34). Exclusion of diet changers and energy mis-reporters did not significantly affect results, but there was a tendency to lower risk of type 2 diabetes among women with high diet quality (HR= 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.03; P for trend = 0.16).

Conclusion:
This study showed that a high diet quality based on the Swedish nutrition recommendations was not associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Further investigation is needed to better understand how overall diet quality and individual dietary components are associated with type 2 diabetes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Mandalazi, Emmanuel LU
supervisor
organization
course
MPHN11 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
4500119
date added to LUP
2014-07-14 10:31:02
date last changed
2015-06-24 15:07:42
@misc{4500119,
  abstract     = {Background: The rapid increase in type 2 diabetes worldwide has mainly been attributed to lifestyle factors, including poor eating habits and physical inactivity. Type and quality of diet is a key factor in both prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. 

Aim: To investigate the association between diet quality and risk of type 2 diabetes. 

Methods and Subjects: This prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort included 26,172 subjects (62% women) aged 44 to 74 years at baseline (1991-1996), with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. By 31 December 2009, 2,829 subjects were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dietary intakes were estimated using a modified diet history method. A diet quality index was constructed based on adherence to recommended intakes of saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. Subjects were categorized into three groups. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model the association between diet quality and risk of incident type 2 diabetes. 

Results: Hazard ratios for incident type 2 diabetes in the highest versus lowest category of diet quality index among men were 1.05 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.25; P for trend = 0.94) and women, 1.03 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.22; P for trend = 0.34). Exclusion of diet changers and energy mis-reporters did not significantly affect results, but there was a tendency to lower risk of type 2 diabetes among women with high diet quality (HR= 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65, 1.03; P for trend = 0.16). 

Conclusion:
This study showed that a high diet quality based on the Swedish nutrition recommendations was not associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Further investigation is needed to better understand how overall diet quality and individual dietary components are associated with type 2 diabetes.},
  author       = {Mandalazi, Emmanuel},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Diet quality and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in the Malmo Diet and Cancer cohort},
  year         = {2014},
}