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What Choice of Equality for Workers with Family Responsibilities?

Jääger, Heleen LU (2015) JAMM06 20141
Department of Law
Abstract
Gone are the days when women were exclusively confined to care work in the private sphere and men dominated in the public sphere. Still, the increase in the number of women in gainful employment has not engendered a more equitable division of family responsibilities inside the family unit. In fact, the birth of a child often entails in itself a ‘re-traditionalisation’ of working and family patterns, notwithstanding the education or work history of the mother or the gender equal ideals of the partners: the breadwinner position of employed men increases, while women who have otherwise left their traditional carer roles return to it once the children are born. Still, many women decide to remain active or return to the labour market after a... (More)
Gone are the days when women were exclusively confined to care work in the private sphere and men dominated in the public sphere. Still, the increase in the number of women in gainful employment has not engendered a more equitable division of family responsibilities inside the family unit. In fact, the birth of a child often entails in itself a ‘re-traditionalisation’ of working and family patterns, notwithstanding the education or work history of the mother or the gender equal ideals of the partners: the breadwinner position of employed men increases, while women who have otherwise left their traditional carer roles return to it once the children are born. Still, many women decide to remain active or return to the labour market after a prolonged leave. Because of perceptions about their capabilities as carers and not as workers, the struggle to reconcile work and family life is more pronounced in the case of women workers. It is the central tenet of this thesis that the effective equality of workers with family responsibilities can be realised by employing the transformative equality concept, meaning that the structural disadvantage against women workers can be overcome only when there is a change in the traditional gender roles of men and women. At the same time, the right design of work-family reconciliation measures has tremendous potential to contribute to this change. For instance, measures aimed at reconciling the work-family conflict have to address both men and women in order to overcome past inequalities produced by the biological difference and/or socially constructed gender roles. Additionally, social partners have a crucial role in expanding the bargaining power of the worker and facilitating the reconciliation of the work-family conflict. (Less)
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author
Jääger, Heleen LU
supervisor
organization
course
JAMM06 20141
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
international labour law, formal equality, substantive equality, equality of treatment, equality of opportunity, equality of results, family responsibilities discrimination, workers with family responsibilities, gender stereotypes, transformative equality, parental leave, Estonia, social partners
language
English
id
4913888
date added to LUP
2015-01-23 11:54:43
date last changed
2015-01-23 11:54:43
@misc{4913888,
  abstract     = {Gone are the days when women were exclusively confined to care work in the private sphere and men dominated in the public sphere. Still, the increase in the number of women in gainful employment has not engendered a more equitable division of family responsibilities inside the family unit. In fact, the birth of a child often entails in itself a ‘re-traditionalisation’ of working and family patterns, notwithstanding the education or work history of the mother or the gender equal ideals of the partners: the breadwinner position of employed men increases, while women who have otherwise left their traditional carer roles return to it once the children are born. Still, many women decide to remain active or return to the labour market after a prolonged leave. Because of perceptions about their capabilities as carers and not as workers, the struggle to reconcile work and family life is more pronounced in the case of women workers. It is the central tenet of this thesis that the effective equality of workers with family responsibilities can be realised by employing the transformative equality concept, meaning that the structural disadvantage against women workers can be overcome only when there is a change in the traditional gender roles of men and women. At the same time, the right design of work-family reconciliation measures has tremendous potential to contribute to this change. For instance, measures aimed at reconciling the work-family conflict have to address both men and women in order to overcome past inequalities produced by the biological difference and/or socially constructed gender roles. Additionally, social partners have a crucial role in expanding the bargaining power of the worker and facilitating the reconciliation of the work-family conflict.},
  author       = {Jääger, Heleen},
  keyword      = {international labour law,formal equality,substantive equality,equality of treatment,equality of opportunity,equality of results,family responsibilities discrimination,workers with family responsibilities,gender stereotypes,transformative equality,parental leave,Estonia,social partners},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {What Choice of Equality for Workers with Family Responsibilities?},
  year         = {2015},
}