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Drönarkriget och folkrätten - En begreppsanalys

Lindeblad, Stephan LU (2015) STVK02 20142
Department of Political Science
Abstract
More than thirteen years have passed since the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001, and only now it seems that the war that followed the attacks is approaching an end. Much has been written about the war on terrorism and, more recently, on the so-called Drone Wars. The Nobel Peace Prize-winner and the President of the United States, Barack Obama, has been criticised by many for the use of UAVs in attacks on individual members of the terrorist organisation al-Qaeda in countries such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. The Drone Wars were for a long time denied by the American administration but was ultimately recognised, and the administration has since then in various ways attempted to legitimise the war. This thesis explores how the... (More)
More than thirteen years have passed since the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001, and only now it seems that the war that followed the attacks is approaching an end. Much has been written about the war on terrorism and, more recently, on the so-called Drone Wars. The Nobel Peace Prize-winner and the President of the United States, Barack Obama, has been criticised by many for the use of UAVs in attacks on individual members of the terrorist organisation al-Qaeda in countries such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. The Drone Wars were for a long time denied by the American administration but was ultimately recognised, and the administration has since then in various ways attempted to legitimise the war. This thesis explores how the legitimisation of the Drone Wars relate to public international law. Which international legal concepts are used? Does the definition used differ from what is common practice in public international law?
The essay shows how the US administration legitimises perhaps the most contested part of their warfare by altering the international legal concepts and also inventing new ones. (Less)
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author
Lindeblad, Stephan LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK02 20142
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Folkrätt, jus ad bellum, jus in ballo, drönare, UAV, al-Qaida
language
Swedish
id
4914035
date added to LUP
2015-02-28 17:07:35
date last changed
2015-02-28 17:07:35
@misc{4914035,
  abstract     = {More than thirteen years have passed since the terrorist attacks of September 11th 2001, and only now it seems that the war that followed the attacks is approaching an end. Much has been written about the war on terrorism and, more recently, on the so-called Drone Wars. The Nobel Peace Prize-winner and the President of the United States, Barack Obama, has been criticised by many for the use of UAVs in attacks on individual members of the terrorist organisation al-Qaeda in countries such as Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. The Drone Wars were for a long time denied by the American administration but was ultimately recognised, and the administration has since then in various ways attempted to legitimise the war. This thesis explores how the legitimisation of the Drone Wars relate to public international law. Which international legal concepts are used? Does the definition used differ from what is common practice in public international law?
The essay shows how the US administration legitimises perhaps the most contested part of their warfare by altering the international legal concepts and also inventing new ones.},
  author       = {Lindeblad, Stephan},
  keyword      = {Folkrätt,jus ad bellum,jus in ballo,drönare,UAV,al-Qaida},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Drönarkriget och folkrätten - En begreppsanalys},
  year         = {2015},
}