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Presence of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol in STPs

Lund, Lisa LU (2015) MVEK02 20151
Studies in Environmental Science
Abstract (Swedish)
The presence of endocrine disrupting compounds, so-called EDC’s, in aquatic environments has become an emerging issue for environmental health. Since the 1990’s these compounds have been displaying estrogenic effects on aquatic organisms downstream from sewage treatment plants (STPs). The cause of the problem is mainly the inability of conventional STP’s to remove these unwanted substances from our wastewater. One substance in particular, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has shown to have effects on aquatic life in as low traces as sub-ng/L to ng/L, resulting in the development of intersex characteristics, leading to infertility in fish. The active ingredient in oral contraceptives and vaginal rings, EE2, is primarily released into sewage... (More)
The presence of endocrine disrupting compounds, so-called EDC’s, in aquatic environments has become an emerging issue for environmental health. Since the 1990’s these compounds have been displaying estrogenic effects on aquatic organisms downstream from sewage treatment plants (STPs). The cause of the problem is mainly the inability of conventional STP’s to remove these unwanted substances from our wastewater. One substance in particular, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has shown to have effects on aquatic life in as low traces as sub-ng/L to ng/L, resulting in the development of intersex characteristics, leading to infertility in fish. The active ingredient in oral contraceptives and vaginal rings, EE2, is primarily released into sewage water after being excreted by women consuming these contraceptives. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the presence of EE2 in STPs is a considerable threat to our environment.
Some countries have adapted more technologically advanced methods for their sewage treatment plants to reduce unwanted substances in the wastewater, but most countries do not see this to be economically feasible. In Sweden, there is currently no specific cleaning technology to remove any type of pharmaceutical from wastewater, including EE2. There are, however, a few promising technologies that can be implemented to eliminate these unwanted substances from spreading to aquatic environments. The question is however if new technological methods are economically feasible considering the associated costs from energy intensive methods and the possible formation of by-products. More research needs to be implemented to find better long-term solutions to improve current conventional STPs and for eliminating EE2 and other unwanted contaminants from our wastewater. (Less)
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author
Lund, Lisa LU
supervisor
organization
course
MVEK02 20151
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
17alpha-ethinylestradiol, sewage treatment plants, wastewater treatment
language
English
id
5212182
date added to LUP
2015-03-26 18:58:49
date last changed
2015-03-26 18:58:49
@misc{5212182,
  abstract     = {The presence of endocrine disrupting compounds, so-called EDC’s, in aquatic environments has become an emerging issue for environmental health. Since the 1990’s these compounds have been displaying estrogenic effects on aquatic organisms downstream from sewage treatment plants (STPs). The cause of the problem is mainly the inability of conventional STP’s to remove these unwanted substances from our wastewater. One substance in particular, 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has shown to have effects on aquatic life in as low traces as sub-ng/L to ng/L, resulting in the development of intersex characteristics, leading to infertility in fish. The active ingredient in oral contraceptives and vaginal rings, EE2, is primarily released into sewage water after being excreted by women consuming these contraceptives. The aim of this study is to evaluate if the presence of EE2 in STPs is a considerable threat to our environment.
Some countries have adapted more technologically advanced methods for their sewage treatment plants to reduce unwanted substances in the wastewater, but most countries do not see this to be economically feasible. In Sweden, there is currently no specific cleaning technology to remove any type of pharmaceutical from wastewater, including EE2. There are, however, a few promising technologies that can be implemented to eliminate these unwanted substances from spreading to aquatic environments. The question is however if new technological methods are economically feasible considering the associated costs from energy intensive methods and the possible formation of by-products. More research needs to be implemented to find better long-term solutions to improve current conventional STPs and for eliminating EE2 and other unwanted contaminants from our wastewater.},
  author       = {Lund, Lisa},
  keyword      = {17alpha-ethinylestradiol,sewage treatment plants,wastewater treatment},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Presence of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol in STPs},
  year         = {2015},
}