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The Exalted Women of Rwanda

Corrigan, Louise LU (2015) MIDM19 20151
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
In 1994 Rwanda was consumed by one of the bloodiest genocides in modern times, culminating in 800,000 dead after twelve weeks. As the country has taken significant strides towards uniting the country across ethnic lines, Rwanda has seen a clear increase in women’s representation in decision-making positions. This has been hallmarked by the inclusion of women in the post-genocide reconciliation process. The objective of this study has been to explore the collective perception of women in reconciliation in Rwanda through the employment of critical discourse analysis, featuring government and civil society representatives. Transcending Rwanda as a unique case, the concept of female gender essentialisms postulates how limited understandings of... (More)
In 1994 Rwanda was consumed by one of the bloodiest genocides in modern times, culminating in 800,000 dead after twelve weeks. As the country has taken significant strides towards uniting the country across ethnic lines, Rwanda has seen a clear increase in women’s representation in decision-making positions. This has been hallmarked by the inclusion of women in the post-genocide reconciliation process. The objective of this study has been to explore the collective perception of women in reconciliation in Rwanda through the employment of critical discourse analysis, featuring government and civil society representatives. Transcending Rwanda as a unique case, the concept of female gender essentialisms postulates how limited understandings of women’s roles in peace and conflict impedes their agency and key findings suggest that the Rwandan reconciliation process is laden with essentialist assumptions of women, evidenced by the narratives of women as bearers of life, non-agents and peacemakers. This representation of women is attributed to the government’s attempts at reconstructing the social fabric of Rwanda. Paradoxically, the very tenets that have sought to increase the participation of women in the post-genocide reconciliation process perpetuates harmful gender stereotypes, threatening not only reconciliation but also the greater quest for women’s emancipation in Rwanda. (Less)
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author
Corrigan, Louise LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A critical discourse analysis of female gender essentialisms within the Rwandan post-genocide reconciliation process
course
MIDM19 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Rwanda, genocide, post-genocide, reconciliation, gender, gender essentialisms
language
English
id
5410081
date added to LUP
2015-06-29 15:24:49
date last changed
2015-06-29 15:24:49
@misc{5410081,
  abstract     = {In 1994 Rwanda was consumed by one of the bloodiest genocides in modern times, culminating in 800,000 dead after twelve weeks. As the country has taken significant strides towards uniting the country across ethnic lines, Rwanda has seen a clear increase in women’s representation in decision-making positions. This has been hallmarked by the inclusion of women in the post-genocide reconciliation process. The objective of this study has been to explore the collective perception of women in reconciliation in Rwanda through the employment of critical discourse analysis, featuring government and civil society representatives. Transcending Rwanda as a unique case, the concept of female gender essentialisms postulates how limited understandings of women’s roles in peace and conflict impedes their agency and key findings suggest that the Rwandan reconciliation process is laden with essentialist assumptions of women, evidenced by the narratives of women as bearers of life, non-agents and peacemakers. This representation of women is attributed to the government’s attempts at reconstructing the social fabric of Rwanda. Paradoxically, the very tenets that have sought to increase the participation of women in the post-genocide reconciliation process perpetuates harmful gender stereotypes, threatening not only reconciliation but also the greater quest for women’s emancipation in Rwanda.},
  author       = {Corrigan, Louise},
  keyword      = {Rwanda,genocide,post-genocide,reconciliation,gender,gender essentialisms},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Exalted Women of Rwanda},
  year         = {2015},
}