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“If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." A case study analyzing the role of collaboration in development projects in Malawi.

Lundström, Anna LU (2015) MIDM19 20151
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
This study questions the linear and top-down planning and implementation methods of mainstream development projects, as they do not seem to: achieve its expected outcomes; respond to the complex development context; or allow development beneficiaries to be a part of deciding their own development, despite promotions of inclusive approaches. The purpose was to explore if collaboration could serve as a better solution by introducing the concept of “Collaborative Project Planning and Implementation” (CPPI). A qualitative case study of one UNICEF project in Malawi, the Project, analyzes both the Project’s structure and the various stakeholders’ values of optimal project practices. The findings show that collaboration between multiple... (More)
This study questions the linear and top-down planning and implementation methods of mainstream development projects, as they do not seem to: achieve its expected outcomes; respond to the complex development context; or allow development beneficiaries to be a part of deciding their own development, despite promotions of inclusive approaches. The purpose was to explore if collaboration could serve as a better solution by introducing the concept of “Collaborative Project Planning and Implementation” (CPPI). A qualitative case study of one UNICEF project in Malawi, the Project, analyzes both the Project’s structure and the various stakeholders’ values of optimal project practices. The findings show that collaboration between multiple stakeholders with beneficiaries as main actors were highly valued by all respondents and also a key for sustainable results. However, the Project’s structure does not allow for collaboration or flexibility in practices. The main bottlenecks seem to be the donor-driven policies, procedures and resource management. The study supports that CPPI offers relevant and more valuable project practices, and that cross-cutting collaboration is the promoted way to re-structure development for greater and more sustainable project outcomes. This stresses the need for CPPI to be further discussed, researched and applied by both academia and development institutions. (Less)
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author
Lundström, Anna LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM19 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Development projects, Project planning and implementation, Collaboration, Collaborative Project Planning and Implementation (CPPI), Complexity theory, Adaptive systems, Critical Theory, Communicative Rationality
language
English
id
5423647
date added to LUP
2015-06-29 15:16:56
date last changed
2015-06-29 15:16:56
@misc{5423647,
  abstract     = {This study questions the linear and top-down planning and implementation methods of mainstream development projects, as they do not seem to: achieve its expected outcomes; respond to the complex development context; or allow development beneficiaries to be a part of deciding their own development, despite promotions of inclusive approaches. The purpose was to explore if collaboration could serve as a better solution by introducing the concept of “Collaborative Project Planning and Implementation” (CPPI). A qualitative case study of one UNICEF project in Malawi, the Project, analyzes both the Project’s structure and the various stakeholders’ values of optimal project practices. The findings show that collaboration between multiple stakeholders with beneficiaries as main actors were highly valued by all respondents and also a key for sustainable results. However, the Project’s structure does not allow for collaboration or flexibility in practices. The main bottlenecks seem to be the donor-driven policies, procedures and resource management. The study supports that CPPI offers relevant and more valuable project practices, and that cross-cutting collaboration is the promoted way to re-structure development for greater and more sustainable project outcomes. This stresses the need for CPPI to be further discussed, researched and applied by both academia and development institutions.},
  author       = {Lundström, Anna},
  keyword      = {Development projects,Project planning and implementation,Collaboration,Collaborative Project Planning and Implementation (CPPI),Complexity theory,Adaptive systems,Critical Theory,Communicative Rationality},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {“If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." A case study analyzing the role of collaboration in development projects in Malawi.},
  year         = {2015},
}