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GMOs for Development

Stojanovic, Milica LU (2015) STVM23 20151
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Given the increasing world population, prices and greenhouse gas emissions, there is
a need to innovate agriculture in order to accelerate crop productivity sustainably.
These issues are compounded in developing countries, which often face severe
droughts, famine, and have limited access to drinking water. Genetically modified
organisms (GMOs) are the proposed solution to these concerns, with an increasing
number of countries reaping the benefits of the new technology.
GMOs are a hotly debated topic in the European Union (EU), but for very
different reasons. Namely, a negative public perception on GMO safety and ethics has
led to a restrictive and precautionary approach to GMO regulation. EU’s GMO policy
has shown an international... (More)
Given the increasing world population, prices and greenhouse gas emissions, there is
a need to innovate agriculture in order to accelerate crop productivity sustainably.
These issues are compounded in developing countries, which often face severe
droughts, famine, and have limited access to drinking water. Genetically modified
organisms (GMOs) are the proposed solution to these concerns, with an increasing
number of countries reaping the benefits of the new technology.
GMOs are a hotly debated topic in the European Union (EU), but for very
different reasons. Namely, a negative public perception on GMO safety and ethics has
led to a restrictive and precautionary approach to GMO regulation. EU’s GMO policy
has shown an international impact, mainly in the poorest countries, many of which are
in sub-Saharan Africa.
To bring a fresh perspective to EU’s GMO debate, this thesis will analyse the
coherence of EU’s GMO policy with its international development objectives,
outlined in EU’s framework Policy Coherence for Development. Linking GMO’s to
the Millennium Development Goals, data suggests that they can have a positive
effect, e.g. on reducing hunger and poverty. Conversely, EU’s GMO policy can act as
a deterrent to developing country GMO acceptance, which would suggest that it is not
coherent with its international development objectives.

Key words: European Union, Genetically Modified Organisms, Policy Coherence for
Development, Millennium Development Goals, sub-Saharan Africa. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Stojanovic, Milica LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
To what extent is EU’s GMO policy coherent with its international development objectives?
course
STVM23 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Genetically Modified Organisms, European Union, Policy Coherence for Development, Millennium Development Goals, sub-Saharan Africa.
language
English
id
5426262
date added to LUP
2015-07-13 11:36:15
date last changed
2015-07-13 11:36:15
@misc{5426262,
  abstract     = {Given the increasing world population, prices and greenhouse gas emissions, there is
a need to innovate agriculture in order to accelerate crop productivity sustainably.
These issues are compounded in developing countries, which often face severe
droughts, famine, and have limited access to drinking water. Genetically modified
organisms (GMOs) are the proposed solution to these concerns, with an increasing
number of countries reaping the benefits of the new technology.
GMOs are a hotly debated topic in the European Union (EU), but for very
different reasons. Namely, a negative public perception on GMO safety and ethics has
led to a restrictive and precautionary approach to GMO regulation. EU’s GMO policy
has shown an international impact, mainly in the poorest countries, many of which are
in sub-Saharan Africa.
To bring a fresh perspective to EU’s GMO debate, this thesis will analyse the
coherence of EU’s GMO policy with its international development objectives,
outlined in EU’s framework Policy Coherence for Development. Linking GMO’s to
the Millennium Development Goals, data suggests that they can have a positive
effect, e.g. on reducing hunger and poverty. Conversely, EU’s GMO policy can act as
a deterrent to developing country GMO acceptance, which would suggest that it is not
coherent with its international development objectives.

Key words: European Union, Genetically Modified Organisms, Policy Coherence for
Development, Millennium Development Goals, sub-Saharan Africa.},
  author       = {Stojanovic, Milica},
  keyword      = {Genetically Modified Organisms,European Union,Policy Coherence for Development,Millennium Development Goals,sub-Saharan Africa.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {GMOs for Development},
  year         = {2015},
}