Advanced

Privacy is the New Black: A Study on the Right to be Forgotten in the EU

Krüll, Tora LU (2015) LAGM01 20151
Department of Law
Abstract
Digitalization has changed society in many ways. One of the results of the development of the online world is that people have formed the habit of sharing all sorts of information about themselves and others to everyone around them at all times. People have adapted to a society where they feel a compulsion to be repeatedly connected and represented on digital networks. However, individuals have started to grasp the fact that the Internet does not only have positive effects. The ‘eternal memory’ of the Internet has instead become a problem. As a result, people are now trying to regain the privacy they allowed the Internet to steal from them and individuals require removal of information they no longer want to be in the public’s... (More)
Digitalization has changed society in many ways. One of the results of the development of the online world is that people have formed the habit of sharing all sorts of information about themselves and others to everyone around them at all times. People have adapted to a society where they feel a compulsion to be repeatedly connected and represented on digital networks. However, individuals have started to grasp the fact that the Internet does not only have positive effects. The ‘eternal memory’ of the Internet has instead become a problem. As a result, people are now trying to regain the privacy they allowed the Internet to steal from them and individuals require removal of information they no longer want to be in the public’s appreciation.
The legislators of the European Union (EU) have presented a proposal for a comprehensive reform of the 1995 data protection rules. The reformed rules are, amongst other things, trying to meet society’s need to reclaim the function of forgetting. On 13 May 2014 the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled in Case C-131/12 Google Spain v. AEPD and Mario Costeja González. The judgement is of great significance for the EU data protection law and fundamental rights law within the EU. The CJEU recognized the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ and a right for individuals to remove links generated by Internet search engine operators. However, the Court’s judgement left several important questions open and this resulted in a lot of academic commentary and a wide range of reactions. This thesis critically examines the current and upcoming legislation, case law and academic commentary concerning the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ and data privacy rights. It is established that the online privacy rights threatens other fundamental rights such as the freedom of expression. However, it is also found that regaining the function of forgetting is of equal importance. Hence, fundamental rights have to be weighed against each other and a balance between the fundamental rights present on the web must be found. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Digitaliseringen har ändrat samhället på många sätt. Idag delar människor med sig av all sorts information om sig själva och andra under nästan alla timmar på dygnet. Människor har anpassat sig till ett samhälle där de känner sig manade att hela tiden vara uppkopplade och representerade på internet. På senare tid har dock människor börjat inse att spridandet av information på internet kan ge oanade effekter. Internets ’eviga minnet’ har resulterat i att information är för evigt tillgänglig och sökmotorer hjälper människor att snabbt och enkelt hitta information från hela världen. Som en reaktion på detta har många börjat kräva en rätt att få radera information som de inte längre vill att allmänheten ska ha tillgång till och människor vill... (More)
Digitaliseringen har ändrat samhället på många sätt. Idag delar människor med sig av all sorts information om sig själva och andra under nästan alla timmar på dygnet. Människor har anpassat sig till ett samhälle där de känner sig manade att hela tiden vara uppkopplade och representerade på internet. På senare tid har dock människor börjat inse att spridandet av information på internet kan ge oanade effekter. Internets ’eviga minnet’ har resulterat i att information är för evigt tillgänglig och sökmotorer hjälper människor att snabbt och enkelt hitta information från hela världen. Som en reaktion på detta har många börjat kräva en rätt att få radera information som de inte längre vill att allmänheten ska ha tillgång till och människor vill nu ha tillbaka det privatliv som de lät internet stjäla från dem.
Europeiska Unionens (EU) lagstiftare har presenterat ett förslag till en omfattande reform av 1995 års lagstiftning avseende datasäkerhet och skydd för personuppgifter. Med den föreslagna lagtexten vill EUs lagstiftare bland annat uppfylla samhällets krav på att återfå möjligheten att bli bortglömd. I maj år 2014 avgjorde Europeiska Unionens domstol målet C-131/12 Google Spain v. AEPD and Mario Costeja González. Målet är av stor betydelse för EU lagstiftningen angående datasäkerhet och grundläggande rättigheter på internet. I målet kom domstolen fram till att medborgare i den Europeiska gemenskapen har en ’rätt att bli bortglömd’ och en rätt att få länkar kopplade till sin person raderade från sökresultat på sökmotorer. Dessvärre lämnade domstolen många frågor öppna och det har resulterat i en mängd reaktioner och diskussioner angående prioriteringen av grundläggande rättigheter på internet. Den här uppsatsen är en kritisk granskning av nuvarande och kommande lagstiftning, praxis och doktrin angående ’rätten att bli bortglömd’ och rätten till privatliv på internet. Det framgår av granskningen att den nya rätten att radera information på internet hotar andra grundläggande rättigheter, som till exempel yttrandefriheten. Många anser däremot att ”rätten att bli bortglömd” är minst lika viktig att skydda i och med internets nya påverkan på samhället. Därmed måste grundläggande rättigheter nu vägas emot varandra och lagstiftarna måste hitta en balans mellan de grundläggande rättigheterna som finns representerade på internet. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Krüll, Tora LU
supervisor
organization
course
LAGM01 20151
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
keywords
EU law, EU-rätt, Right to be Forgotten, rätten att bli bortglömd, yttrandefrihet, freedom of speech
language
English
id
5431902
date added to LUP
2015-06-09 12:51:19
date last changed
2015-06-09 12:51:19
@misc{5431902,
  abstract     = {Digitalization has changed society in many ways. One of the results of the development of the online world is that people have formed the habit of sharing all sorts of information about themselves and others to everyone around them at all times. People have adapted to a society where they feel a compulsion to be repeatedly connected and represented on digital networks. However, individuals have started to grasp the fact that the Internet does not only have positive effects. The ‘eternal memory’ of the Internet has instead become a problem. As a result, people are now trying to regain the privacy they allowed the Internet to steal from them and individuals require removal of information they no longer want to be in the public’s appreciation.
 The legislators of the European Union (EU) have presented a proposal for a comprehensive reform of the 1995 data protection rules. The reformed rules are, amongst other things, trying to meet society’s need to reclaim the function of forgetting. On 13 May 2014 the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) ruled in Case C-131/12 Google Spain v. AEPD and Mario Costeja González. The judgement is of great significance for the EU data protection law and fundamental rights law within the EU. The CJEU recognized the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ and a right for individuals to remove links generated by Internet search engine operators. However, the Court’s judgement left several important questions open and this resulted in a lot of academic commentary and a wide range of reactions. This thesis critically examines the current and upcoming legislation, case law and academic commentary concerning the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ and data privacy rights. It is established that the online privacy rights threatens other fundamental rights such as the freedom of expression. However, it is also found that regaining the function of forgetting is of equal importance. Hence, fundamental rights have to be weighed against each other and a balance between the fundamental rights present on the web must be found.},
  author       = {Krüll, Tora},
  keyword      = {EU law,EU-rätt,Right to be Forgotten,rätten att bli bortglömd,yttrandefrihet,freedom of speech},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Privacy is the New Black: A Study on the Right to be Forgotten in the EU},
  year         = {2015},
}