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The Resource Curse on a Micro Level: A Case Study of Mining in Malawi

Lindskog, Daniella LU (2015) STVK12 20151
Department of Political Science
Abstract
The scramble for Africa’s natural resources has never been more prominent. Rather than contributing to development through means of mineral rents, countries such as Malawi appear to be suffering as result of increased investment from multinational mining corporations. Also known as the resource curse, Malawi’s high natural resource endowment is hurting its citizens, rather than benefitting them. While the majority of studies within the resource curse thesis focus on the adverse effects on a national scale, this paper is centered on a natural resource curse in a local context, where mining has its most immediate and largest impact. This study is based on qualitative field research in the capital, Lilongwe, and in the rural mining town of... (More)
The scramble for Africa’s natural resources has never been more prominent. Rather than contributing to development through means of mineral rents, countries such as Malawi appear to be suffering as result of increased investment from multinational mining corporations. Also known as the resource curse, Malawi’s high natural resource endowment is hurting its citizens, rather than benefitting them. While the majority of studies within the resource curse thesis focus on the adverse effects on a national scale, this paper is centered on a natural resource curse in a local context, where mining has its most immediate and largest impact. This study is based on qualitative field research in the capital, Lilongwe, and in the rural mining town of Karonga in Malawi. My findings have indicated that symptoms of the resource curse go beyond national and economic indicators. As a result of mining, the resource curse in Karonga has translated to livelihoods being compromised as a result of: displacement and resettlement, employment by mining companies, corruption; and unfulfilled promises of new schools, hospitals, and amenities such as running water and electricity. In addition to communities, mining firms have shown little concern for the environment and the spread of toxic waste. The overall lack of transparency and accountability by mining companies and government have shown to be the main contributors to a resource curse in Karonga. (Less)
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author
Lindskog, Daniella LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK12 20151
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Resource Curse, Micro level, Communities, Environment
language
English
id
5435691
date added to LUP
2015-07-14 12:38:00
date last changed
2015-07-14 12:38:00
@misc{5435691,
  abstract     = {The scramble for Africa’s natural resources has never been more prominent. Rather than contributing to development through means of mineral rents, countries such as Malawi appear to be suffering as result of increased investment from multinational mining corporations. Also known as the resource curse, Malawi’s high natural resource endowment is hurting its citizens, rather than benefitting them. While the majority of studies within the resource curse thesis focus on the adverse effects on a national scale, this paper is centered on a natural resource curse in a local context, where mining has its most immediate and largest impact. This study is based on qualitative field research in the capital, Lilongwe, and in the rural mining town of Karonga in Malawi. My findings have indicated that symptoms of the resource curse go beyond national and economic indicators. As a result of mining, the resource curse in Karonga has translated to livelihoods being compromised as a result of: displacement and resettlement, employment by mining companies, corruption; and unfulfilled promises of new schools, hospitals, and amenities such as running water and electricity. In addition to communities, mining firms have shown little concern for the environment and the spread of toxic waste. The overall lack of transparency and accountability by mining companies and government have shown to be the main contributors to a resource curse in Karonga.},
  author       = {Lindskog, Daniella},
  keyword      = {Resource Curse,Micro level,Communities,Environment},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Resource Curse on a Micro Level: A Case Study of Mining in Malawi},
  year         = {2015},
}