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Real-time Panorama Stitching using a Single PTZ-Camera without using Image Feature Matching

Lindahl, Rikard LU and Linse, Hampus (2015) In Master's Theses in Mathematical Sciences FMA820 20151
Mathematics (Faculty of Engineering)
Abstract
In surveillance applications one thing to consider is how much of a scene one can cover with a camera. One way to augment this is to take images with overlap and blend them, creating a new image with bigger field of view and thereby increase the scene coverage. In this thesis work we have been looking at how one can create panorama images with a pan-tilt-camera and how fast it can be done. We chose a circular panorama representation for this. Our approach was that gathering enough metadata from the camera one can rectify the gathered images and blend them without matching feature-points or other computationally heavy operations. We show that this can be done. The images gathered was corrected for lens distortions and rolling shutter... (More)
In surveillance applications one thing to consider is how much of a scene one can cover with a camera. One way to augment this is to take images with overlap and blend them, creating a new image with bigger field of view and thereby increase the scene coverage. In this thesis work we have been looking at how one can create panorama images with a pan-tilt-camera and how fast it can be done. We chose a circular panorama representation for this. Our approach was that gathering enough metadata from the camera one can rectify the gathered images and blend them without matching feature-points or other computationally heavy operations. We show that this can be done. The images gathered was corrected for lens distortions and rolling shutter effects arising from rotating the camera. Attempts where made to find an optimal path for the camera to follow while capturing images. An algorithm to do intensity corrections of the images was also implemented. We find that one can rotate the camera at high speeds and still produce a good quality panorama image. The limiting factors are the precision of the meta data gathered, like motion data from the on-board gyro, and the lighting conditions, since a short shutter time is required to minimize motion blur. The quality varies depending on the time taken to capture the images needed to create the spherical projection. The fastest run was done in 1.6 seconds with some distortions. A run in around 4 seconds generally produce a good quality panorama image. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Lindahl, Rikard LU and Linse, Hampus
supervisor
organization
course
FMA820 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
Master's Theses in Mathematical Sciences
report number
LUTFMA-3277-2015
ISSN
1404-6342
other publication id
2015:E17
language
English
id
5468896
date added to LUP
2015-06-18 12:01:42
date last changed
2015-06-18 12:01:42
@misc{5468896,
  abstract     = {In surveillance applications one thing to consider is how much of a scene one can cover with a camera. One way to augment this is to take images with overlap and blend them, creating a new image with bigger field of view and thereby increase the scene coverage. In this thesis work we have been looking at how one can create panorama images with a pan-tilt-camera and how fast it can be done. We chose a circular panorama representation for this. Our approach was that gathering enough metadata from the camera one can rectify the gathered images and blend them without matching feature-points or other computationally heavy operations. We show that this can be done. The images gathered was corrected for lens distortions and rolling shutter effects arising from rotating the camera. Attempts where made to find an optimal path for the camera to follow while capturing images. An algorithm to do intensity corrections of the images was also implemented. We find that one can rotate the camera at high speeds and still produce a good quality panorama image. The limiting factors are the precision of the meta data gathered, like motion data from the on-board gyro, and the lighting conditions, since a short shutter time is required to minimize motion blur. The quality varies depending on the time taken to capture the images needed to create the spherical projection. The fastest run was done in 1.6 seconds with some distortions. A run in around 4 seconds generally produce a good quality panorama image.},
  author       = {Lindahl, Rikard and Linse, Hampus},
  issn         = {1404-6342},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master's Theses in Mathematical Sciences},
  title        = {Real-time Panorama Stitching using a Single PTZ-Camera without using Image Feature Matching},
  year         = {2015},
}