Advanced

Lost in Gairaigo

Tomas Vel Tomaszewska, Caroline LU (2015) JAPK11 20151
Japanese Studies
Abstract
The Japanese language consists of a large number of loanwords, which derived from both China and the West. It is believed by many that influence by the English language began with the American occupation just after the Second World War. The loanwords from especially English increased vastly in number ever since. Today, the foreign loanwords from the West, gairaigo, makes up to approximately 10% in the Japanese language, and still increasing. Since new words are introduced into Japanese, especially for concepts that do not exist in the language and words for things coming from abroad, many native words have been replaced with the loanwords in several fields in the daily life of Japanese people.
This thesis deals with the possibility of the... (More)
The Japanese language consists of a large number of loanwords, which derived from both China and the West. It is believed by many that influence by the English language began with the American occupation just after the Second World War. The loanwords from especially English increased vastly in number ever since. Today, the foreign loanwords from the West, gairaigo, makes up to approximately 10% in the Japanese language, and still increasing. Since new words are introduced into Japanese, especially for concepts that do not exist in the language and words for things coming from abroad, many native words have been replaced with the loanwords in several fields in the daily life of Japanese people.
This thesis deals with the possibility of the difficulty for native speakers to find the native words and an assumption that there might be a gap between the genders, younger and older generations where the younger generations prefer using gairaigo words instead of their native counterparts. This is examined through a questionnaire answered by a total of 60 native speakers and through previous researches. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Tomas Vel Tomaszewska, Caroline LU
supervisor
organization
course
JAPK11 20151
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Japanese, Loanwords, Gairaigo, History, Linguistics, Gender
language
English
id
7358930
date added to LUP
2015-06-23 10:56:06
date last changed
2015-06-23 10:56:06
@misc{7358930,
  abstract     = {The Japanese language consists of a large number of loanwords, which derived from both China and the West. It is believed by many that influence by the English language began with the American occupation just after the Second World War. The loanwords from especially English increased vastly in number ever since. Today, the foreign loanwords from the West, gairaigo, makes up to approximately 10% in the Japanese language, and still increasing. Since new words are introduced into Japanese, especially for concepts that do not exist in the language and words for things coming from abroad, many native words have been replaced with the loanwords in several fields in the daily life of Japanese people.
This thesis deals with the possibility of the difficulty for native speakers to find the native words and an assumption that there might be a gap between the genders, younger and older generations where the younger generations prefer using gairaigo words instead of their native counterparts. This is examined through a questionnaire answered by a total of 60 native speakers and through previous researches.},
  author       = {Tomas Vel Tomaszewska, Caroline},
  keyword      = {Japanese,Loanwords,Gairaigo,History,Linguistics,Gender},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Lost in Gairaigo},
  year         = {2015},
}