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Buster - A Vacuum Cleaner Concept for Children

Lekeberg, Tina (2015) In Diploma work IDE820 20151
Industrial Design
Abstract
The power of play: Play motivates and stimulates true human curiosity and interest. While playing with toys (any object that seems interesting at a given time, intended toy or not),
children are taught how to control and get knowledge of things, objects and materials.

If the children have learned this in their childhood, they will continue “controlling and understanding them” later in life. When exploring the world around them there is a lot to be
said for allowing young children to help out when they express interest in doing so and think it’s fun. Considering the long term positive effects of such engagement it is arguably worth
the extra time this may take rather than saying “No, you mustn’t help out with this, I’ll take care of... (More)
The power of play: Play motivates and stimulates true human curiosity and interest. While playing with toys (any object that seems interesting at a given time, intended toy or not),
children are taught how to control and get knowledge of things, objects and materials.

If the children have learned this in their childhood, they will continue “controlling and understanding them” later in life. When exploring the world around them there is a lot to be
said for allowing young children to help out when they express interest in doing so and think it’s fun. Considering the long term positive effects of such engagement it is arguably worth
the extra time this may take rather than saying “No, you mustn’t help out with this, I’ll take care of it myself” and potentially ending up with an eight year old who never wants to tidy his
or her room because he or she was never allowed to do so when they wanted to.

The starting point of this Diploma Project was to explore how such interaction and serious play can be afforded and encouraged through everyday products in this specific case exemplified by the development of the cooperative vacuum cleaner Buster -the ultimate pet
that cleans messes rather than creates them. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Lekeberg, Tina
supervisor
organization
course
IDE820 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
publication/series
Diploma work
report number
ISRN: LUT-DVIDE/ EX--15/50266—SE
ISSN
ISRN
language
English
id
7439938
date added to LUP
2015-06-23 10:14:59
date last changed
2015-06-23 10:14:59
@misc{7439938,
  abstract     = {The power of play: Play motivates and stimulates true human curiosity and interest. While playing with toys (any object that seems interesting at a given time, intended toy or not),
children are taught how to control and get knowledge of things, objects and materials.

If the children have learned this in their childhood, they will continue “controlling and understanding them” later in life. When exploring the world around them there is a lot to be
said for allowing young children to help out when they express interest in doing so and think it’s fun. Considering the long term positive effects of such engagement it is arguably worth
the extra time this may take rather than saying “No, you mustn’t help out with this, I’ll take care of it myself” and potentially ending up with an eight year old who never wants to tidy his
or her room because he or she was never allowed to do so when they wanted to.

The starting point of this Diploma Project was to explore how such interaction and serious play can be afforded and encouraged through everyday products in this specific case exemplified by the development of the cooperative vacuum cleaner Buster -the ultimate pet
that cleans messes rather than creates them.},
  author       = {Lekeberg, Tina},
  issn         = {ISRN},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Diploma work},
  title        = {Buster - A Vacuum Cleaner Concept for Children},
  year         = {2015},
}