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Inducing Lasting Attitude Change Through Choice - A Choice Blindness Study on Political Views

Sivén, David LU (2015) KOGM20 20151
Cognitive Science
Abstract
Studies of decision-making have shown that attitudes can be influenced by choices. One way in which to study these types of attitude changes can be through the choice blindness paradigm. Choice blindness is the well documented finding that people may both fail to notice that the outcome of a choice does not correspond to what was intended, and at the same time construct coherent arguments in support of the reversal of their original choice. However, the temporal persistence of the attitude change induced has not received much attention. In order to investigate the longevity of a choice induced attitude change, as well as if this indeed can be achieved through the choice blindness paradigm, a two-day experiment was executed. The experiment... (More)
Studies of decision-making have shown that attitudes can be influenced by choices. One way in which to study these types of attitude changes can be through the choice blindness paradigm. Choice blindness is the well documented finding that people may both fail to notice that the outcome of a choice does not correspond to what was intended, and at the same time construct coherent arguments in support of the reversal of their original choice. However, the temporal persistence of the attitude change induced has not received much attention. In order to investigate the longevity of a choice induced attitude change, as well as if this indeed can be achieved through the choice blindness paradigm, a two-day experiment was executed. The experiment used political statements, to which participants rated their agreement. Participants’ attitudes were measured thrice, once before a covert manipulation of their ratings, and twice with one week apart, after the participants had been presented with what they were told were their own ratings, but which in fact were the opposite. In addition, the length of justification for answers was added as a factor to see if this would influence the persistence of attitude change, since it has been shown that longer deliberation time increases attitude polarization. After a week, 37% of the ratings were of the form of attitude reversals, contrasted with 12% for control statements, which were not manipulated. This provides us with evidence that choice induced attitude change has a lasting effect, and that temporally persistent attitude changes can be induced through choice blindness. (Less)
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author
Sivén, David LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Att framkalla varaktig attitydförändring genom beslut - En beslutblindhetsstudie på politiska åskådningar
course
KOGM20 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
confabulation, preference change through choice, preference change, decision making, choice blindness
language
English
id
7442709
date added to LUP
2015-08-21 16:36:05
date last changed
2015-08-21 16:36:05
@misc{7442709,
  abstract     = {Studies of decision-making have shown that attitudes can be influenced by choices. One way in which to study these types of attitude changes can be through the choice blindness paradigm. Choice blindness is the well documented finding that people may both fail to notice that the outcome of a choice does not correspond to what was intended, and at the same time construct coherent arguments in support of the reversal of their original choice. However, the temporal persistence of the attitude change induced has not received much attention. In order to investigate the longevity of a choice induced attitude change, as well as if this indeed can be achieved through the choice blindness paradigm, a two-day experiment was executed. The experiment used political statements, to which participants rated their agreement. Participants’ attitudes were measured thrice, once before a covert manipulation of their ratings, and twice with one week apart, after the participants had been presented with what they were told were their own ratings, but which in fact were the opposite. In addition, the length of justification for answers was added as a factor to see if this would influence the persistence of attitude change, since it has been shown that longer deliberation time increases attitude polarization. After a week, 37% of the ratings were of the form of attitude reversals, contrasted with 12% for control statements, which were not manipulated. This provides us with evidence that choice induced attitude change has a lasting effect, and that temporally persistent attitude changes can be induced through choice blindness.},
  author       = {Sivén, David},
  keyword      = {confabulation,preference change through choice,preference change,decision making,choice blindness},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Inducing Lasting Attitude Change Through Choice - A Choice Blindness Study on Political Views},
  year         = {2015},
}