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Co-create Social Innovation - A mapping of Co-creation methods for Social Innovation

Grina, Joakim (2015) MIO920
Production Management
Abstract
Background and issue of
study:
The global financial crisis, climate change, demographic
changes, and rising inequality are some of the global
trends that put pressure on public leaders and
organizations, civil society organizations and corporations
to shift to a social and environmental sustainable
development. Social innovations are demanded to be both
drivers of positive societal change and forces against
negative developments. Often cross-sectoral, open and
collaborative, create new relationships and are built on
pro-sumption, grassroots involvement, bottom-up
processes, co-production and mutualism. Aspects that can
be enhanced with the support of well-designed and wellhosted
co-creation activities and processes. Even if... (More)
Background and issue of
study:
The global financial crisis, climate change, demographic
changes, and rising inequality are some of the global
trends that put pressure on public leaders and
organizations, civil society organizations and corporations
to shift to a social and environmental sustainable
development. Social innovations are demanded to be both
drivers of positive societal change and forces against
negative developments. Often cross-sectoral, open and
collaborative, create new relationships and are built on
pro-sumption, grassroots involvement, bottom-up
processes, co-production and mutualism. Aspects that can
be enhanced with the support of well-designed and wellhosted
co-creation activities and processes. Even if there
is a common understanding that co-creation plays an
important role in the creation of social innovation there is
a lack of clarity on what co-creation is and how to actually
co-create social innovation. This report aims to give
taxonomy for co-creation of social innovation and a
general co-creation process that structures the different
co-creation methods in a useful way. It is meant to brief
people that are new to the area and give a practical
framework for social innovation practitioners.
Purpose statement:
The main purpose with this report is to understand the cocreation
methods that are used for enabling Social
Innovation.
Three sub-purposes:
• Sub-purpose one is to identify and describe which cocreation
concepts and methods are used among social
innovation actors in the same context as Lund
University Social Innovation Center (LUSIC).
• Sub-purpose two is to design and present a
framework that makes it easier to find the "best" cocreation
method for the perceived situation during the
co-creation process.
• Sub-purpose three is to explain how the framework
can be used to easy find the "best" co-creation
method for the perceived situation during the cocreation
process, or plan and implement an entire cocreation
process.
4
Methodology:
Basic theory about co-creation has been compiled from
relevant academic articles and complemented with theory
from references found during the field research.
A field study methodology inspired by the first phase in
the Design Thinking process, Inspiration, has been used in
order to find co-creation concepts, and offer a better
understanding of the concepts and the co-creation
methods they included. During this process 23 relevant
actors and events in South Sweden, Denmark, South
Finland, and the Basque Country were visited.
From presentations, observations, discussions, and
participation relevant information and insights where
gathered through notes and pictures. The information from
the field studies has then been complemented with more
literature studies about co-creation concepts and methods
that were identified during the field studies. In order to
find a process that could structure the co-creation methods
a methodology inspired by the second step in the Design
Thinking process, Ideation, was used. First an early
prototype, a sketch, was created and then developed into
the final co-creation process and table for social
innovation. Finally found co-creation methods were sorted
into the table.
Conclusions:
The found co-creation concepts in the social innovation
are: Art of Hosting, Design Thinking, Service Design,
Graphic Facilitation, Visual Thinking, the Business Model
Canvas and Transversal Dialogue. The designed structure
for how to find the appropriate method for common
situations during a co-creation process is a co-creation
method table divided after a designed co-creation process
built up by three main phases: A. Discover, B. Ideation
and C. Implementation. The phases are divided into subphases
and some of the sub-phases are divided into steps.
The different co-creation methods are sorted into the table
according to the sub-phases and the steps. The
recommended way to use the co-creation method table is
to co-create the social innovation process with stickynotes
in a Graphic roadmap with activities (sub-phases
and steps) and methods from the co-creation method table. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Grina, Joakim
supervisor
organization
course
MIO920
year
type
M1 - University Diploma
subject
keywords
Co-creation, Social Innovation, Design Thinking, Human Centered Design, Participatory Design, Art of Hosting, Visual Thinking, Graphic Facilitation, Service Design
other publication id
15/5523
language
English
id
7454853
date added to LUP
2015-06-26 13:45:00
date last changed
2015-06-26 13:45:00
@misc{7454853,
  abstract     = {Background and issue of
study:
The global financial crisis, climate change, demographic
changes, and rising inequality are some of the global
trends that put pressure on public leaders and
organizations, civil society organizations and corporations
to shift to a social and environmental sustainable
development. Social innovations are demanded to be both
drivers of positive societal change and forces against
negative developments. Often cross-sectoral, open and
collaborative, create new relationships and are built on
pro-sumption, grassroots involvement, bottom-up
processes, co-production and mutualism. Aspects that can
be enhanced with the support of well-designed and wellhosted
co-creation activities and processes. Even if there
is a common understanding that co-creation plays an
important role in the creation of social innovation there is
a lack of clarity on what co-creation is and how to actually
co-create social innovation. This report aims to give
taxonomy for co-creation of social innovation and a
general co-creation process that structures the different
co-creation methods in a useful way. It is meant to brief
people that are new to the area and give a practical
framework for social innovation practitioners.
Purpose statement:
The main purpose with this report is to understand the cocreation
methods that are used for enabling Social
Innovation.
Three sub-purposes:
• Sub-purpose one is to identify and describe which cocreation
concepts and methods are used among social
innovation actors in the same context as Lund
University Social Innovation Center (LUSIC).
• Sub-purpose two is to design and present a
framework that makes it easier to find the "best" cocreation
method for the perceived situation during the
co-creation process.
• Sub-purpose three is to explain how the framework
can be used to easy find the "best" co-creation
method for the perceived situation during the cocreation
process, or plan and implement an entire cocreation
process.
4
Methodology:
Basic theory about co-creation has been compiled from
relevant academic articles and complemented with theory
from references found during the field research.
A field study methodology inspired by the first phase in
the Design Thinking process, Inspiration, has been used in
order to find co-creation concepts, and offer a better
understanding of the concepts and the co-creation
methods they included. During this process 23 relevant
actors and events in South Sweden, Denmark, South
Finland, and the Basque Country were visited.
From presentations, observations, discussions, and
participation relevant information and insights where
gathered through notes and pictures. The information from
the field studies has then been complemented with more
literature studies about co-creation concepts and methods
that were identified during the field studies. In order to
find a process that could structure the co-creation methods
a methodology inspired by the second step in the Design
Thinking process, Ideation, was used. First an early
prototype, a sketch, was created and then developed into
the final co-creation process and table for social
innovation. Finally found co-creation methods were sorted
into the table.
Conclusions:
The found co-creation concepts in the social innovation
are: Art of Hosting, Design Thinking, Service Design,
Graphic Facilitation, Visual Thinking, the Business Model
Canvas and Transversal Dialogue. The designed structure
for how to find the appropriate method for common
situations during a co-creation process is a co-creation
method table divided after a designed co-creation process
built up by three main phases: A. Discover, B. Ideation
and C. Implementation. The phases are divided into subphases
and some of the sub-phases are divided into steps.
The different co-creation methods are sorted into the table
according to the sub-phases and the steps. The
recommended way to use the co-creation method table is
to co-create the social innovation process with stickynotes
in a Graphic roadmap with activities (sub-phases
and steps) and methods from the co-creation method table.},
  author       = {Grina, Joakim},
  keyword      = {Co-creation,Social Innovation,Design Thinking,Human Centered Design,Participatory Design,Art of Hosting,Visual Thinking,Graphic Facilitation,Service Design},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Co-create Social Innovation - A mapping of Co-creation methods for Social Innovation},
  year         = {2015},
}