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The effect of very light exercise on recognition memory in relation to attention ability

Hagström, Hans Mikael LU (2015) PSYM99 20142
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Moderate exercise is deemed beneficial for cognition due to increase in dopamine concentrations in the basal ganglia. Auditory white noise is beneficial for cognition, mainly for those with lower attentional ability, i.e. for those having lower tonic dopamine concentrations. For individuals with higher attention ability white noise can have a negative effect. In this thesis it was examined whether very light exercise can function as a parallel to auditory white noise and, based on individual attention ability, have a beneficial effect on cognition and recognition memory. This is examined by testing recognition memory in two conditions: while walking and while being seated. Participants (N = 26) were recruited among university students and... (More)
Moderate exercise is deemed beneficial for cognition due to increase in dopamine concentrations in the basal ganglia. Auditory white noise is beneficial for cognition, mainly for those with lower attentional ability, i.e. for those having lower tonic dopamine concentrations. For individuals with higher attention ability white noise can have a negative effect. In this thesis it was examined whether very light exercise can function as a parallel to auditory white noise and, based on individual attention ability, have a beneficial effect on cognition and recognition memory. This is examined by testing recognition memory in two conditions: while walking and while being seated. Participants (N = 26) were recruited among university students and the general public, in two smaller towns in Sweden. Sitting was found to be more beneficial for recognition memory. This result was expected as the sample consisted of individuals with average to slightly above average attention ability. No other significant differences were found since the sample failed to include individuals with lower attention ability whom were the ones hypothesised to be most affected by the study. Further research with better sample is proposed as well as more attention demanding tasks to better identify a possible effect. (Less)
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author
Hagström, Hans Mikael LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYM99 20142
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
basal ganglia, attention, exercise, moderate brain arousal, recognition memory
language
English
id
7455587
date added to LUP
2015-08-03 13:27:34
date last changed
2015-08-03 13:27:34
@misc{7455587,
  abstract     = {Moderate exercise is deemed beneficial for cognition due to increase in dopamine concentrations in the basal ganglia. Auditory white noise is beneficial for cognition, mainly for those with lower attentional ability, i.e. for those having lower tonic dopamine concentrations. For individuals with higher attention ability white noise can have a negative effect. In this thesis it was examined whether very light exercise can function as a parallel to auditory white noise and, based on individual attention ability, have a beneficial effect on cognition and recognition memory. This is examined by testing recognition memory in two conditions: while walking and while being seated. Participants (N = 26) were recruited among university students and the general public, in two smaller towns in Sweden. Sitting was found to be more beneficial for recognition memory. This result was expected as the sample consisted of individuals with average to slightly above average attention ability. No other significant differences were found since the sample failed to include individuals with lower attention ability whom were the ones hypothesised to be most affected by the study. Further research with better sample is proposed as well as more attention demanding tasks to better identify a possible effect.},
  author       = {Hagström, Hans Mikael},
  keyword      = {basal ganglia,attention,exercise,moderate brain arousal,recognition memory},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The effect of very light exercise on recognition memory in relation to attention ability},
  year         = {2015},
}