Advanced

The Organizational Process: its Impact on Climate Negotiations

Volt, Jonathan LU (2015) STVM25 20151
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Structural variables have been incapable of providing a fully satisfactory answer to why multilateral conferences can fail one year but succeed the next. Scholars focusing on the role of the presidency have been more successful, but a sole focus on the presidency, which comprise one part of an organizational process, might give us a partial understanding of the procedural dynamics in place. The process of international climate negotiations consists of regular meetings, relationships and common rules, routines and norms: similar to an archetypal organization. With an organizational perspective, new insights into why multilateral negotiations fail or succeed are disclosed.
Through a qualitative approach, comparing the subsequent climate... (More)
Structural variables have been incapable of providing a fully satisfactory answer to why multilateral conferences can fail one year but succeed the next. Scholars focusing on the role of the presidency have been more successful, but a sole focus on the presidency, which comprise one part of an organizational process, might give us a partial understanding of the procedural dynamics in place. The process of international climate negotiations consists of regular meetings, relationships and common rules, routines and norms: similar to an archetypal organization. With an organizational perspective, new insights into why multilateral negotiations fail or succeed are disclosed.
Through a qualitative approach, comparing the subsequent climate negotiations in Copenhagen and Cancun, including first-hand interviews, a systematic review of official documents and second-hand sources, a clear picture of what happened is depicted and analyzed. Findings show that the normal working process had been altered in Copenhagen due to special circumstances. Furthermore, the alignment between process managers was superior in Cancun, which fostered a high level of diplomacy and expertise. Finally, transparency in the process can generate trust and a more efficient negotiation process. This thesis shows that an efficient organizational process increases the probability of a successful outcome. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Volt, Jonathan LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Comparing two Multilateral Conferences from an Organizational Perspective
course
STVM25 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Copenhagen Accord, Cancun Agreements, the Organizational Process, UNFCCC, Conference of Parties, Transparency, International Climate Negotiations
language
English
id
7757582
date added to LUP
2015-09-09 17:23:49
date last changed
2015-09-09 17:23:49
@misc{7757582,
  abstract     = {Structural variables have been incapable of providing a fully satisfactory answer to why multilateral conferences can fail one year but succeed the next. Scholars focusing on the role of the presidency have been more successful, but a sole focus on the presidency, which comprise one part of an organizational process, might give us a partial understanding of the procedural dynamics in place. The process of international climate negotiations consists of regular meetings, relationships and common rules, routines and norms: similar to an archetypal organization. With an organizational perspective, new insights into why multilateral negotiations fail or succeed are disclosed. 
Through a qualitative approach, comparing the subsequent climate negotiations in Copenhagen and Cancun, including first-hand interviews, a systematic review of official documents and second-hand sources, a clear picture of what happened is depicted and analyzed. Findings show that the normal working process had been altered in Copenhagen due to special circumstances. Furthermore, the alignment between process managers was superior in Cancun, which fostered a high level of diplomacy and expertise. Finally, transparency in the process can generate trust and a more efficient negotiation process. This thesis shows that an efficient organizational process increases the probability of a successful outcome.},
  author       = {Volt, Jonathan},
  keyword      = {Copenhagen Accord,Cancun Agreements,the Organizational Process,UNFCCC,Conference of Parties,Transparency,International Climate Negotiations},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Organizational Process: its Impact on Climate Negotiations},
  year         = {2015},
}