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(En)gendered security in Rwanda and Liberia

Sterner, Desirée LU (2015) FKVK02 20151
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Many consider United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 a ground-breaking document, and as a resolution which attest to the new ambition of gender equality in the international community. However, questions remains of the actual effects of UNSCR 1325. This thesis analyses and compares the peace processes in Liberia and Rwanda in order to understand how UNSCR 1325 have affected them. The analysis uses the term (en)gendered security, a three levelled concept based on UNSRC 1325 created by Kara Ellerby, to further the understanding of the implementation of UNSRC 1325. Ellerby divides the implementation of UNSCR 1325 to the three levels basic-, secondary- and indicator-level, and this thesis focuses on the secondary level. The study show... (More)
Many consider United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 a ground-breaking document, and as a resolution which attest to the new ambition of gender equality in the international community. However, questions remains of the actual effects of UNSCR 1325. This thesis analyses and compares the peace processes in Liberia and Rwanda in order to understand how UNSCR 1325 have affected them. The analysis uses the term (en)gendered security, a three levelled concept based on UNSRC 1325 created by Kara Ellerby, to further the understanding of the implementation of UNSRC 1325. Ellerby divides the implementation of UNSCR 1325 to the three levels basic-, secondary- and indicator-level, and this thesis focuses on the secondary level. The study show that of the four properties of inclusion found on the secondary level, the peace processes in Rwanda and Liberia fulfils all four: representation, incorporation, protection, and recognition. This indicates an increased awareness of (en)gendered security. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Sterner, Desirée LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A comparative case study of the peace processes in post-conflict Rwanda and Liberia
course
FKVK02 20151
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Rwanda, Liberia, UNSCR 1325, post-conflict, (en)gender security
language
English
id
7759563
date added to LUP
2015-09-09 17:04:19
date last changed
2015-09-09 17:04:19
@misc{7759563,
  abstract     = {Many consider United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 a ground-breaking document, and as a resolution which attest to the new ambition of gender equality in the international community. However, questions remains of the actual effects of UNSCR 1325. This thesis analyses and compares the peace processes in Liberia and Rwanda in order to understand how UNSCR 1325 have affected them. The analysis uses the term (en)gendered security, a three levelled concept based on UNSRC 1325 created by Kara Ellerby, to further the understanding of the implementation of UNSRC 1325. Ellerby divides the implementation of UNSCR 1325 to the three levels basic-, secondary- and indicator-level, and this thesis focuses on the secondary level. The study show that of the four properties of inclusion found on the secondary level, the peace processes in Rwanda and Liberia fulfils all four: representation, incorporation, protection, and recognition. This indicates an increased awareness of (en)gendered security.},
  author       = {Sterner, Desirée},
  keyword      = {Rwanda,Liberia,UNSCR 1325,post-conflict,(en)gender security},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {(En)gendered security in Rwanda and Liberia},
  year         = {2015},
}