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Design aspects of a ventilated facade with integrated photovoltaics - Evaluation as a refurbishment solution for office buildings inSweden

Moutsatsos, Ioannis Antonios LU and Foulaki, Evangelia LU (2015) AEBM01 20151
Energy and Building Design
Abstract
Swedish office buildings of the 60’s present at least 27% higher heating demand than from the current standards foreseen. This underlines their need for energy renovation. Meanwhile, office buildings are occupied during daytime, thus internal and solar gains are in phase. Consequently, such buildings could experience overheating problems. A seasonal adaptable envelope, such as a ventilated double skin façade, can be a potential improvement to both, heating and cooling issues of office spaces. At the same time, EU regulations imply that by 2020 all buildings should produce the energy they consume, on an annual basis. This energy should come from renewable sources. Solar electricity systems linked to buildings are often integrated in... (More)
Swedish office buildings of the 60’s present at least 27% higher heating demand than from the current standards foreseen. This underlines their need for energy renovation. Meanwhile, office buildings are occupied during daytime, thus internal and solar gains are in phase. Consequently, such buildings could experience overheating problems. A seasonal adaptable envelope, such as a ventilated double skin façade, can be a potential improvement to both, heating and cooling issues of office spaces. At the same time, EU regulations imply that by 2020 all buildings should produce the energy they consume, on an annual basis. This energy should come from renewable sources. Solar electricity systems linked to buildings are often integrated in building envelopes. However, the electricity conversion efficiency of these systems decreases with increasing temperature.

In the first part of this thesis the aim is to examine the critical design parameters of a ventilated façade with integrated photovoltaics, and analyze its impact on the thermal performance of a typical cell office with a 60’s envelope, located in Southern Sweden. Investigations are focused on the energy use and the thermal comfort quality of the room and they are performed for two window-to-wall ratios and four orientations. In the second part of the work, the focus is given on evaluating the effect of the cavity’s ventilation on the PV’s efficiency and annual energy production.

The study concluded that an upgrade to a ventilated double skin façade can yield a decrease of 30% to 60% on the energy use of a typical cell office, achieving the current requirements. The lowest energy use is attained through a low emittance external glazing combined with a reflective shading. The integration of solar cells does not lead to an overall improved performance compared to a case without photovoltaics. The cavity ventilation resulted in a maximum increase of 6.5 % on the solar cells’ efficiency, but the increase of the annual electricity output is at maximum 2% and was considered negligible. (Less)
Popular Abstract
Nowadays, the building regulations set strict criteria concerning the energy use of buildings, in an effort to reduce the consumption of the building sector that corresponds to 40% of the global energy consumption. In Sweden, 50% of the buildings were constructed between 1960 and 1990. The majority, and mainly the ones from the 60’s do not reach the current energy requirements. This demonstrates the need for energy refurbishment of these buildings. A seasonal adaptable envelope could be beneficial for office buildings, which have both heating and cooling demand. Moreover, according to EU regulations, buildings should produce the energy they consume until 2020. Thus, focus has been given on onsite energy production, which can be supported... (More)
Nowadays, the building regulations set strict criteria concerning the energy use of buildings, in an effort to reduce the consumption of the building sector that corresponds to 40% of the global energy consumption. In Sweden, 50% of the buildings were constructed between 1960 and 1990. The majority, and mainly the ones from the 60’s do not reach the current energy requirements. This demonstrates the need for energy refurbishment of these buildings. A seasonal adaptable envelope could be beneficial for office buildings, which have both heating and cooling demand. Moreover, according to EU regulations, buildings should produce the energy they consume until 2020. Thus, focus has been given on onsite energy production, which can be supported by building integrated photovoltaics. The present work examines the performance of a ventilated double skin façade system with integrated solar cells. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Moutsatsos, Ioannis Antonios LU and Foulaki, Evangelia LU
supervisor
organization
course
AEBM01 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
thermal comfort, energy efficiency, refurbishment, photovoltaics, double skin façade
language
English
id
7861086
date added to LUP
2016-05-02 09:37:42
date last changed
2016-05-02 09:37:42
@misc{7861086,
  abstract     = {Swedish office buildings of the 60’s present at least 27% higher heating demand than from the current standards foreseen. This underlines their need for energy renovation. Meanwhile, office buildings are occupied during daytime, thus internal and solar gains are in phase. Consequently, such buildings could experience overheating problems. A seasonal adaptable envelope, such as a ventilated double skin façade, can be a potential improvement to both, heating and cooling issues of office spaces. At the same time, EU regulations imply that by 2020 all buildings should produce the energy they consume, on an annual basis. This energy should come from renewable sources. Solar electricity systems linked to buildings are often integrated in building envelopes. However, the electricity conversion efficiency of these systems decreases with increasing temperature.

In the first part of this thesis the aim is to examine the critical design parameters of a ventilated façade with integrated photovoltaics, and analyze its impact on the thermal performance of a typical cell office with a 60’s envelope, located in Southern Sweden. Investigations are focused on the energy use and the thermal comfort quality of the room and they are performed for two window-to-wall ratios and four orientations. In the second part of the work, the focus is given on evaluating the effect of the cavity’s ventilation on the PV’s efficiency and annual energy production.

The study concluded that an upgrade to a ventilated double skin façade can yield a decrease of 30% to 60% on the energy use of a typical cell office, achieving the current requirements. The lowest energy use is attained through a low emittance external glazing combined with a reflective shading. The integration of solar cells does not lead to an overall improved performance compared to a case without photovoltaics. The cavity ventilation resulted in a maximum increase of 6.5 % on the solar cells’ efficiency, but the increase of the annual electricity output is at maximum 2% and was considered negligible.},
  author       = {Moutsatsos, Ioannis Antonios and Foulaki, Evangelia},
  keyword      = {thermal comfort,energy efficiency,refurbishment,photovoltaics,double skin façade},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Design aspects of a ventilated facade with integrated photovoltaics - Evaluation as a refurbishment solution for office buildings inSweden},
  year         = {2015},
}