Advanced

Developement of a portable β-­‐ spectrometer for in situ measurements of Sr-­‐90 and Y-­‐90 using a plastic scintillator and a silicon photomultipler (SiPM).

Krona, Daniel (2015) MSFT01 20151
Medical Radiation Physics, Lund
Medical Physics Programme
Abstract
In the event of a nuclear weapon detonation or a power plant accident radionuclides will deposit on the ground. It is then important to identify and quantify the radionuclides to obtain information necessary for radiation protection efforts like relocation and decontamination.

Radiation protection instruments with beta probes can be used as search instruments but the small surface of the probe and the lack of separation of beta energy are limitations concerning identification and quantification of the important radionuclide Sr-90. The present alternative for Sr-90 analysis is to collect grass and soil samples and perform time consuming radiochemistry and measurements.

Using a plastic scintillation detector, Sr-90 and the daughter... (More)
In the event of a nuclear weapon detonation or a power plant accident radionuclides will deposit on the ground. It is then important to identify and quantify the radionuclides to obtain information necessary for radiation protection efforts like relocation and decontamination.

Radiation protection instruments with beta probes can be used as search instruments but the small surface of the probe and the lack of separation of beta energy are limitations concerning identification and quantification of the important radionuclide Sr-90. The present alternative for Sr-90 analysis is to collect grass and soil samples and perform time consuming radiochemistry and measurements.

Using a plastic scintillation detector, Sr-90 and the daughter radionuclide yttrium-90 can be identified and quantified. Sr-90 is of special interest due to its uptake and accumulation in the human skeleton. The high beta energy from Y-90 can be utilised to discriminate this radionuclide from other pure beta emitting radionuclides with lower beta energies.

Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) have been the common choice for light collection from scintillating materials for a long period of time. The development of alternatives has been successful the last years in form of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). Silicon photomultiplier is a photodiode consisting of multiple cells operating in Geiger mode.

The setup consisted of a 15 mm thick plastic scintillator disc where a 1.5 meter long wavelength shifting fibre was wired around the edge surfaces and coupled to a SiPM mounted in a power supply and amplification unit. The signal was processed by a digitizer and the data was analysed using a laptop PC. The measurements were performed with a Sr-90/Y-90 source, a Cs-137 source and a Co-60 source. Uniformity, protection from ambient light, temperature dependence was investigated. The SiPM sensitivity to beta particles was tested by exposing the SiPM to Sr-90/Y-90 without a detector. The evaluation of the CAEN SP5600 kit was done by using the mini spectrometer and the three detectors for collection of spectra from Sr-90/Y-90 and Cs-137.

The setup was not totally light tight, but the ambient light wouldn’t disturb the measurements of radionuclides. The setup was uniform regarding collection of beta particles from a Sr-90/Y- 90 source, but the SiPM could yield a signal if it was hit by beta particles directly. The detection limit is currently relatively high, but there is a potential for considerable
improvements.

Regarding the evaluation of the CAEN SP5600 kit, the associated mini spectrometer
containing a 3 x 3 mm2 SiPM and three different types of detectors were used. This resulted in low detection limits and easy identification and quantification of Sr-90/Y-90. The conclusion is that it is possible to measure Sr-90/Y-90 using a plastic scintillator and a SiPM under laboratory conditions. (Less)
Popular Abstract (Swedish)
Om ett kärnvapen detoneras i atmosfären eller en allvarlig kärnkräftsolycka, likt Tjernobyl, inträffar kommer radioaktivt nedfall att ske. Nedfallet innehåller radioaktiva ämnen som kommer att spridas ut över ett stort område med vind eller nederbörd. Vid denna situation är det viktigt att kunna identifiera vilka radioaktiva ämnen som finns på marken samt vilken radioaktivitet dessa har för att kunna avgöra vilka åtgärder som behövs sättas in för att minimera stråldosen till människan och omgivningen. Speciellt viktig att identifiera och kvantifiera är betastrålaren strontium-90 eftersom denna radionuklid inte ger något utslag vid de mätningar som normalt görs efter ett nedfall. Strontium-90 tas även upp i skelettet och ger därmed en hög... (More)
Om ett kärnvapen detoneras i atmosfären eller en allvarlig kärnkräftsolycka, likt Tjernobyl, inträffar kommer radioaktivt nedfall att ske. Nedfallet innehåller radioaktiva ämnen som kommer att spridas ut över ett stort område med vind eller nederbörd. Vid denna situation är det viktigt att kunna identifiera vilka radioaktiva ämnen som finns på marken samt vilken radioaktivitet dessa har för att kunna avgöra vilka åtgärder som behövs sättas in för att minimera stråldosen till människan och omgivningen. Speciellt viktig att identifiera och kvantifiera är betastrålaren strontium-90 eftersom denna radionuklid inte ger något utslag vid de mätningar som normalt görs efter ett nedfall. Strontium-90 tas även upp i skelettet och ger därmed en hög stråldos till benmärgen som är extra strålkänslig.

De nuvarande strålningsdetektorerna som används för att spåra betastrålare har en liten yta och kan inte separera de olika radioaktiva ämnena. Genom att utnyttja att strontium-90 sönderfaller till yttrium-90 kan man detektera yttrium-90 som har mycket hög partikelenergi och då få information om strontium-90. En strålningsdetektoruppställning som skulle kunna användas består av en plastscintillator, en optisk fiber och en ljusdetektor. När partiklar från radioaktiva ämnen träffar plastscintillator interagerar partiklarna med materialet och scintillationsljus sänds ut. Detta ljus samlas upp av en optisk fiber och leder det till ljusdetektorn som konverterar ljuset till en signal som en dator kan hantera där då resultatet ses.

För att testa om detektoruppställningen fungerar bra har det gjorts mätningar på de vanligaste och mest relevanta radioaktiva ämnena. Det har också testats om detektorn är lika känslig över hela ingångsytan för partiklarna och om mätningarna störs av omgivande ljus. Angående ljusdetektorn har det testats om den är beroende av temperatur samt om partiklar som träffar ljusdetektorn direkt kan påverka mätningarna.

Resultatet av examensarbetet visar att det är möjligt att detektera strontium-90 och yttrium-90 även om dessa omges av andra radioaktiva ämnen. Detektorn är lika känslig över hela ingångsytan och är inte helt ljustät, men det omgivande ljuset stör inte mätningar avsevärt.

Ljusdetektorn var temperaturberoende och därför är det att föredra att vänta tills temperaturen i elektroniken har stabiliserats. Partiklar som träffar ljusdetektorn direkt kan komma att störa mätningarna. En uppställning med en längre optisk fiber där plastscintillator och ljusdetektor
mer separerade hade kunnat minska denna effekt. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Krona, Daniel
supervisor
organization
course
MSFT01 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
7865585
date added to LUP
2015-09-13 13:03:23
date last changed
2017-01-09 16:31:52
@misc{7865585,
  abstract     = {In the event of a nuclear weapon detonation or a power plant accident radionuclides will deposit on the ground. It is then important to identify and quantify the radionuclides to obtain information necessary for radiation protection efforts like relocation and decontamination.

Radiation protection instruments with beta probes can be used as search instruments but the small surface of the probe and the lack of separation of beta energy are limitations concerning identification and quantification of the important radionuclide Sr-90. The present alternative for Sr-90 analysis is to collect grass and soil samples and perform time consuming radiochemistry and measurements.

Using a plastic scintillation detector, Sr-90 and the daughter radionuclide yttrium-90 can be identified and quantified. Sr-90 is of special interest due to its uptake and accumulation in the human skeleton. The high beta energy from Y-90 can be utilised to discriminate this radionuclide from other pure beta emitting radionuclides with lower beta energies.

Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) have been the common choice for light collection from scintillating materials for a long period of time. The development of alternatives has been successful the last years in form of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). Silicon photomultiplier is a photodiode consisting of multiple cells operating in Geiger mode.

The setup consisted of a 15 mm thick plastic scintillator disc where a 1.5 meter long wavelength shifting fibre was wired around the edge surfaces and coupled to a SiPM mounted in a power supply and amplification unit. The signal was processed by a digitizer and the data was analysed using a laptop PC. The measurements were performed with a Sr-90/Y-90 source, a Cs-137 source and a Co-60 source. Uniformity, protection from ambient light, temperature dependence was investigated. The SiPM sensitivity to beta particles was tested by exposing the SiPM to Sr-90/Y-90 without a detector. The evaluation of the CAEN SP5600 kit was done by using the mini spectrometer and the three detectors for collection of spectra from Sr-90/Y-90 and Cs-137.

The setup was not totally light tight, but the ambient light wouldn’t disturb the measurements of radionuclides. The setup was uniform regarding collection of beta particles from a Sr-90/Y- 90 source, but the SiPM could yield a signal if it was hit by beta particles directly. The detection limit is currently relatively high, but there is a potential for considerable
improvements.

Regarding the evaluation of the CAEN SP5600 kit, the associated mini spectrometer
containing a 3 x 3 mm2 SiPM and three different types of detectors were used. This resulted in low detection limits and easy identification and quantification of Sr-90/Y-90. The conclusion is that it is possible to measure Sr-90/Y-90 using a plastic scintillator and a SiPM under laboratory conditions.},
  author       = {Krona, Daniel},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Developement of a portable β-­‐ spectrometer for in situ measurements of Sr-­‐90 and Y-­‐90 using a plastic scintillator and a silicon photomultipler (SiPM).},
  year         = {2015},
}