Advanced

Private conservation : hope for biodiversity conservation? : a multiple-case study of private protected areas in Ecuador

Arellano Gosdenovich, Lorena LU (2015) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM02 20152
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
Unlike other environmental threats, the loss of biodiversity is irreversible and the current and rapid loss of species is alarming. Several authors agree the state-owned protected areas are not sufficient to lessen biodiversity loss which is accentuated because most of the biodiversity is on private land. In this thesis, I study private conservation’s role as a tool for biodiversity conservation and the constraints they face. I visited five private protected areas (PPA) in Ecuador where I conducted semi-structured interviews with the owners or administrators of the reserves. From my data and previous studies, I conclude PPAs’ contribution to the national conservation goals is to work as a supplement by expanding and connecting conservation... (More)
Unlike other environmental threats, the loss of biodiversity is irreversible and the current and rapid loss of species is alarming. Several authors agree the state-owned protected areas are not sufficient to lessen biodiversity loss which is accentuated because most of the biodiversity is on private land. In this thesis, I study private conservation’s role as a tool for biodiversity conservation and the constraints they face. I visited five private protected areas (PPA) in Ecuador where I conducted semi-structured interviews with the owners or administrators of the reserves. From my data and previous studies, I conclude PPAs’ contribution to the national conservation goals is to work as a supplement by expanding and connecting conservation areas where the state’s efforts are not enough. On the other hand, private interest can clash with these conservation goals; PPAs might be tempted, for example, to protect only ecosystems appealing for tourists or keep animals captive as a tourist attraction. The common conflicts the selected PPAs have are illegal logging, poaching and illegal settlements. The interviewees claimed there is not state support either, despite reporting these cases constantly. This situation is exacerbated by the lack of a legal framework to recognize, monitor, evaluate and support private conservation in Ecuador. However, one of the objectives to improve the national systems of protected areas (where PPAs are included) is to develop a legal framework for private conservation. This legal framework should include different actors at different levels, from local stakeholders to national authorities. Human groups and how their livelihoods are affected by the creation of PPAs must be taken into consideration as well. It is imperative to go further state’s actions and rescaling out environmental governance while finding a balance between conservation and human needs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Arellano Gosdenovich, Lorena LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM02 20152
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
private conservation, private protected areas, biodiversity conservation, Ecuador, sustainability science.
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2015:034
funder
Svenska Institutet
language
English
additional info
Funder: Swedish Institute
id
8081496
date added to LUP
2015-10-22 15:42:40
date last changed
2015-10-22 15:42:40
@misc{8081496,
  abstract     = {Unlike other environmental threats, the loss of biodiversity is irreversible and the current and rapid loss of species is alarming. Several authors agree the state-owned protected areas are not sufficient to lessen biodiversity loss which is accentuated because most of the biodiversity is on private land. In this thesis, I study private conservation’s role as a tool for biodiversity conservation and the constraints they face. I visited five private protected areas (PPA) in Ecuador where I conducted semi-structured interviews with the owners or administrators of the reserves. From my data and previous studies, I conclude PPAs’ contribution to the national conservation goals is to work as a supplement by expanding and connecting conservation areas where the state’s efforts are not enough. On the other hand, private interest can clash with these conservation goals; PPAs might be tempted, for example, to protect only ecosystems appealing for tourists or keep animals captive as a tourist attraction. The common conflicts the selected PPAs have are illegal logging, poaching and illegal settlements. The interviewees claimed there is not state support either, despite reporting these cases constantly. This situation is exacerbated by the lack of a legal framework to recognize, monitor, evaluate and support private conservation in Ecuador. However, one of the objectives to improve the national systems of protected areas (where PPAs are included) is to develop a legal framework for private conservation. This legal framework should include different actors at different levels, from local stakeholders to national authorities. Human groups and how their livelihoods are affected by the creation of PPAs must be taken into consideration as well. It is imperative to go further state’s actions and rescaling out environmental governance while finding a balance between conservation and human needs.},
  author       = {Arellano Gosdenovich, Lorena},
  keyword      = {private conservation,private protected areas,biodiversity conservation,Ecuador,sustainability science.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Private conservation : hope for biodiversity conservation? : a multiple-case study of private protected areas in Ecuador},
  year         = {2015},
}